2069 Hubble

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2069 Hubble
Discovery [1]
Discovered by Indiana University
(Indiana Asteroid Program)
Discovery site Goethe Link Obs.
Discovery date 29 March 1955
Designations
MPC designation 2069 Hubble
Named after
Edwin Hubble[2]
1955 FT · 1953 VN1
1969 TB1 · 1970 WA1
1975 TT3
main-belt
Orbital characteristics[1]
Epoch 13 January 2016 (JD 2457400.5)
Uncertainty parameter 0
Observation arc 61.01 yr (22283 days)
Aphelion 3.7397 AU (559.45 Gm)
Perihelion 2.5746 AU (385.15 Gm)
3.1572 AU (472.31 Gm)
Eccentricity 0.18452
5.61 yr (2049.0 d)
336.78°
0° 10m 32.52s / day
Inclination 9.1014°
46.435°
70.082°
Earth MOID 1.60835 AU (240.606 Gm)
Jupiter MOID 1.51153 AU (226.122 Gm)
Jupiter Tisserand parameter 3.160
Physical characteristics
Dimensions 34.5 km
Mean radius
17.265 ± 1.15 km
32.52 h (1.355 d)
0.0538 ± 0.008
11.3

2069 Hubble, provisional designation 1955 FT, is a dark-colored asteroid from the main belt, about 35 kilometers in diameter. It was discovered by the Indiana Asteroid Program at Goethe Link Observatory on March 29, 1955. The asteroid orbits the Sun at a distance of 2.6–3.7 AU once every 5.61 years (2,049 days). It has a relatively low geometric albedo of 0.05.[1]

Photometric measurements of the asteroid made in 2005 by astronomer Brian D. Warner at the Palmer Divide Observatory showed an unusual tri-modal light curve with a period of 32.52 ± 0.02 hours and a brightness variation of 0.10 ± 0.02 in magnitude.[3]

The asteroid was named after the famous American astronomer Edwin Hubble (1889–1953). He pioneered in the exploration of the Universe beyond the Milky Way galaxy and established a self-consistent distance scale as far as the 100-inch Hooker Telescope at Mount Wilson Observatory could reach. Hubble's law and the discovery of the expanding Universe were his greatest achievements. His classification scheme for galaxies, the Hubble sequence, is still the standard and often called the Hubble tuning-fork. He also discovered the minor planet 1373 Cincinnati, his only asteroid discovery. The lunar crater Hubble is also named after him.[2]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c "JPL Small-Body Database Browser: 2069 Hubble (1955 FT)" (2015-09-23 last obs.). Jet Propulsion Laboratory. Retrieved 17 April 2016. 
  2. ^ a b Schmadel, Lutz D. (2003). Dictionary of Minor Planet Names – (2069) Hubble. Springer Berlin Heidelberg. pp. 167–168. ISBN 978-3-540-29925-7. Retrieved 23 August 2016. 
  3. ^ Warner, Brian D. (2005), "Asteroid lightcurve analysis at the Palmer Divide Observatory - winter 2004-2005" (PDF), The Minor Planet Bulletin, 32 (3), pp. 54–58, Bibcode:2005MPBu...32...54W, retrieved 2013-02-03. 

External links[edit]