206 Hersilia

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206 Hersilia
Discovery
Discovered by C. H. F. Peters
Discovery date 13 October 1879
Designations
Named after
Hersilia
1961 WG, 1974 PM
Main belt
Orbital characteristics[1]
Epoch 31 July 2016 (JD 2457600.5)
Uncertainty parameter 0
Observation arc 136.34 yr (49798 d)
Aphelion 2.84299 AU (425.305 Gm)
Perihelion 2.63811 AU (394.656 Gm)
2.74055 AU (409.980 Gm)
Eccentricity 0.037379
4.54 yr (1657.1 d)
17.99 km/s
348.975°
0° 13m 2.078s / day
Inclination 3.77868°
145.169°
299.705°
Earth MOID 1.65522 AU (247.617 Gm)
Jupiter MOID 2.23091 AU (333.739 Gm)
Jupiter Tisserand parameter 3.346
Physical characteristics
Dimensions 113 km
Mass unknown
Mean density
unknown
Equatorial surface gravity
unknown
Equatorial escape velocity
unknown
11.122 h (0.4634 d)
0.055
Temperature unknown
C
8.68

206 Hersilia is a fairly large Main belt asteroid. It was discovered by C. H. F. Peters on October 13, 1879 in Clinton, New York. The asteroid was named after Hersilia, Roman wife of Romulus. It is classified as a primitive, dark carbon-rich C-type asteroid.

Measurements made with the IRAS observatory give a diameter of 101.72 ± 5.18 km and a geometric albedo of 0.06 ± 0.01. By comparison, the MIPS photometer on the Spitzer Space Telescope gives a diameter of 97.99 ± 7.40 km and a geometric albedo of 0.06 ± 0.02.[2]

The last close earth transit was in November and December 2002.

References[edit]

  1. ^ "206 Hersilia". JPL Small-Body Database. NASA/Jet Propulsion Laboratory. Retrieved 12 May 2016. 
  2. ^ Ryan, Erin Lee; et al. (April 2012), "The Kilometer-Sized Main Belt Asteroid Population as Revealed by Spitzer", eprint arXiv, arXiv:1204.1116free to read, Bibcode:2012arXiv1204.1116R. 

External links[edit]