2080 Jihlava

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2080 Jihlava
Discovery [1]
Discovered by P. Wild
Discovery site Zimmerwald Obs.
Discovery date 27 February 1976
Designations
MPC designation 2080 Jihlava
Named after
Jihlava (Czech city)[2]
1976 DG · 1955 SH1
1955 SH2 · 1955 VF
1968 UO · 1970 GF2
1973 GY
main-belt · Flora[3]
Orbital characteristics[1]
Epoch 13 January 2016 (JD 2457400.5)
Uncertainty parameter 0
Observation arc 59.90 yr (21880 days)
Aphelion 2.3095 AU (345.50 Gm)
Perihelion 2.0439 AU (305.76 Gm)
2.1767 AU (325.63 Gm)
Eccentricity 0.061001
3.21 yr (1173.0 d)
224.28°
0° 18m 24.876s / day
Inclination 3.8512°
23.851°
51.314°
Earth MOID 1.06026 AU (158.613 Gm)
Jupiter MOID 2.81599 AU (421.266 Gm)
Jupiter Tisserand parameter 3.679
Physical characteristics
Dimensions 5.77±0.69 km[4]
7.14 km (calculated)[3]
2.70876 h (0.112865 d)[1][5]
2.70888±0.00001 h[5]
2.709±0.001 h[5]
0.633±0.259[4]
0.24 (assumed)[3]
S[3]
12.9

2080 Jihlava, provisional designation 1976 DG, is a stony asteroid from the inner regions of the asteroid belt, about 7 kilometers in diameter. It was discovered by astronomer Paul Wild at Zimmerwald Observatory near Bern, Switzerland on 27 February 1976.[6]

The asteroid is a member of the Flora family, a large group of stony inner main-belt asteroids. It orbits the Sun at a distance of 2.0–2.3 AU once every 3.21 years (1,173 days). Its orbit shows an eccentricity of 0.06 and is tilted by 4 degrees to the plane of the ecliptic. It has a rotation period of 2.71 hours.[5] The S-type asteroid has an albedo of about 0.24, even though preliminary analysis of data gathered by the WISE/NEOWISE mission gave an exceptionally high value of 0.63.[4]

It is named after the city of Jihlava in the Czech Republic. The Moravian town, by the river of the same name was founded in the 11th century and is the country's oldest mining town with a community that prospered from rich silver deposits. The municipal and mining laws of Jihlava were to become a model for analogous regulations all over the world. The name was proposed by Ivo Baueršíma, a geodesist at the University of Berne and co-discoverer of the minor planet 9711 Želetava, in honor of his native town.[2]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c "JPL Small-Body Database Browser: 2080 Jihlava (1976 DG)" (2015-08-14 last obs.). Jet Propulsion Laboratory. Retrieved 17 April 2016. 
  2. ^ a b Schmadel, Lutz D. (2003). Dictionary of Minor Planet Names – (2080) Jihlava. Springer Berlin Heidelberg. p. 169. ISBN 978-3-540-29925-7. Retrieved 9 November 2015. 
  3. ^ a b c d "LCDB Data for (2080) Jihlava". Asteroid Lightcurve Database (LCDB). Retrieved 9 November 2015. 
  4. ^ a b c Masiero, Joseph R.; Mainzer, A. K.; Grav, T.; Bauer, J. M.; Cutri, R. M.; Nugent, C.; Cabrera, M. S. (November 2012). "Preliminary Analysis of WISE/NEOWISE 3-Band Cryogenic and Post-cryogenic Observations of Main Belt Asteroids". The Astrophysical Journal Letters. 759 (1): 5. arXiv:1209.5794free to read. Bibcode:2012ApJ...759L...8M. doi:10.1088/2041-8205/759/1/L8. Retrieved 9 November 2015. 
  5. ^ a b c d Behrend, Raoul. "Asteroids and comets rotation curves – (2080) Jihlava". Geneva Observatory. Retrieved 9 November 2015. 
  6. ^ "2080 Jihlava (1976 DG)". Minor Planet Center. Retrieved 9 November 2015. 

External links[edit]