2090s

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"2095" redirects here. For other uses, see 2095 (disambiguation).
"2099" redirects here. For other uses, see 2099 (disambiguation).
Millennium: 3rd millennium
Centuries: 20th century21st century22nd century
Decades: 2060s 2070s 2080s2090s2100s 2110s 2120s
Years: 2090 2091 2092 2093 2094 2095 2096 2097 2098 2099

The 2090s is a decade of the Gregorian calendar that will begin on January 1, 2090 and will end on December 31, 2099.

Notable predictions and known events[edit]

2090[edit]

  • September 23 – Total Solar Eclipse in the UK. The next total eclipse visible in the UK follows a track similar to that of August 11, 1999, but shifted slightly further north and occurring very near sunset. Maximum duration in Cornwall will be 2 minutes and 10 seconds. Same day and month as the eclipse of September 23, 1699.
  • The European Energy Council and Greenpeace believes that the entire world can be powered by renewable energy by 2090.

2092[edit]

2094[edit]

2095[edit]

  • Based on current trends, gender equality in the workplace will be achieved on a global basis.[2]

2096[edit]

  • February 29 – First time that Ash Wednesday falls on February 29.
  • 2096 is the last leap year before 2100, which will not be a leap year.

2099[edit]

Fictional events[edit]

2090[edit]

  • The racing game Ballistics is set in 2090.
  • In the Star Trek universe, the Orpheus Mining Colony on Luna is established. (From Star Trek Enterprise: "Terra Prime").
  • In the 1994 Disney series, Timon & Pumbaa Episode "Amazon Quiver", the ending sets in this year.

2091[edit]

2092[edit]

2093[edit]

2094[edit]

2095[edit]

2096[edit]

2097[edit]

2099[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Enoch, Nick (February 29, 2012). "World's oldest nuclear power station closes... but it will take 90 more years and £954m to clear it completely". Daily Mail (London). Retrieved 29 February 2012. 
  2. ^ "2095: The Year of Gender Equality in the Workplace, Maybe". World Economic Forum. 28 October 2014. Retrieved 28 October 2014. 
  3. ^ "No rainforest, no monsoon: get ready for a warmer world". NewScientist.