209 Dido

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209 Dido
Discovery
Discovered by C. H. F. Peters
Discovery date 22 October 1879
Designations
MPC designation (209) Dido
Named after
Dido
A909 AB, A909 GB,
A912 RB
Main belt
Adjectives Didonian
Orbital characteristics[1]
Epoch 31 July 2016 (JD 2457600.5)
Uncertainty parameter 0
Observation arc 136.47 yr (49845 d)
Aphelion 3.33106 AU (498.319 Gm)
Perihelion 2.96843 AU (444.071 Gm)
3.14974 AU (471.194 Gm)
Eccentricity 0.057565
5.59 yr (2041.8 d)
16.79 km/s
311.722°
0° 10m 34.738s / day
Inclination 7.17313°
0.682681°
248.387°
Earth MOID 1.96485 AU (293.937 Gm)
Jupiter MOID 1.71077 AU (255.928 Gm)
Jupiter Tisserand parameter 3.193
Physical characteristics
Dimensions 159.94±3.1 km[1]
140.35 ± 10.12 km[2]
Mass (4.59 ± 7.42) × 1018 kg[2]
5.7366 h (0.23903 d)[1][3]
0.0349±0.001
C
8.24

209 Dido is a very large main-belt asteroid. It is classified as a C-type asteroid and is probably composed of carbonaceous materials. Like many asteroids of its type, it has an extremely low albedo.

It was discovered by C. H. F. Peters on October 22, 1879, in Clinton, New York and was named after the mythical Carthaginian queen Dido.

Photometric observations at the Palmer Divide Observatory during 2005 showed a rotation period of 5.7366 ± 0.0005 hours with a brightness variation of 0.17 ± 0.02 in magnitude.[3]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c "209 Dido". JPL Small-Body Database. NASA/Jet Propulsion Laboratory. Retrieved 12 May 2016. 
  2. ^ a b Carry, B. (December 2012), "Density of asteroids", Planetary and Space Science, 73, pp. 98–118, Bibcode:2012P&SS...73...98C, arXiv:1203.4336Freely accessible, doi:10.1016/j.pss.2012.03.009.  See Table 1.
  3. ^ a b Warner, Brian D. (December 2005), "Asteroid lightcurve analysis at the Palmer Divide Observatory - spring 2005", The Minor Planet Bulletin, 32 (4): 90–92, Bibcode:2005MPBu...32...90W. 

External links[edit]