211 Isolda

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211 Isolda
Discovery
Discovered byJohann Palisa
Discovery date10 December 1879
Designations
MPC designation(211) Isolda
Named after
Iseult
A912 AB, A912 BA,
1950 FM
Main belt
Orbital characteristics[1]
Epoch 31 July 2016 (JD 2457600.5)
Uncertainty parameter 0
Observation arc136.19 yr (49742 d)
Aphelion3.53270 AU (528.484 Gm)
Perihelion2.5514 AU (381.68 Gm)
3.04205 AU (455.084 Gm)
Eccentricity0.16129
5.31 yr (1938.0 d)
17.08 km/s
260.142°
0° 11m 8.74s / day
Inclination3.8856°
263.644°
173.522°
Physical characteristics
Dimensions143.19±5.1 km[1]
149.81 ± 6.10 km[2]
Mass(4.49 ± 2.43) × 1018 kg[2]
Mean density
2.54 ± 1.41 g/cm3[2]
18.365 h (0.7652 d)
0.0602±0.004[1]
0.0598 ± 0.0218[3]
C[3] (Tholen)
7.89,[1] 7.90[3]

Isolda (minor planet designation: 211 Isolda) is a very large, dark main-belt asteroid. It is classified as a C-type asteroid and is probably composed of primitive carbonaceous material. The spectra of the asteroid displays evidence of aqueous alteration.[4]

It was discovered by Austrian astronomer Johann Palisa on December 10, 1879, in Pola, and named after Isolde, heroine of the legend of Tristan and Iseult.

In 2001, the asteroid was detected by radar from the Arecibo Observatory at a distance of 1.78 AU. The resulting data yielded an effective diameter of 143 ± 16 km.[5]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d "211 Isolda". JPL Small-Body Database. NASA/Jet Propulsion Laboratory. Retrieved 12 May 2016.
  2. ^ a b c Carry, B. (December 2012), "Density of asteroids", Planetary and Space Science, 73, pp. 98–118, arXiv:1203.4336, Bibcode:2012P&SS...73...98C, doi:10.1016/j.pss.2012.03.009. See Table 1.
  3. ^ a b c Pravec, P.; et al. (May 2012), "Absolute Magnitudes of Asteroids and a Revision of Asteroid Albedo Estimates from WISE Thermal Observations", Asteroids, Comets, Meteors 2012, Proceedings of the conference held May 16–20, 2012 in Niigata, Japan (1667), Bibcode:2012LPICo1667.6089P. See Table 4.
  4. ^ Fornasier, S.; et al. (February 1999), "Spectroscopic comparison of aqueous altered asteroids with CM2 carbonaceous chondrite meteorites", Astronomy and Astrophysics Supplement, 135: 65−73, Bibcode:1999A&AS..135...65F, doi:10.1051/aas:1999161.
  5. ^ Magri, Christopher; et al. (January 2007), "A radar survey of main-belt asteroids: Arecibo observations of 55 objects during 1999 2003" (PDF), Icarus, 186 (1): 126–151, Bibcode:2007Icar..186..126M, doi:10.1016/j.icarus.2006.08.018, retrieved 2015-04-14.

External links[edit]