2127 Tanya

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2127 Tanya
Discovery [1]
Discovered by L. Chernykh
Discovery site CrAO (Nauchnyj)
Discovery date 29 May 1971
Designations
MPC designation 2127 Tanya
Named after
Tanya Savicheva[2]
1971 KB1 · 1953 GH1
main-belt (outer)
Orbital characteristics[1]
Epoch 13 January 2016 (JD 2457400.5)
Uncertainty parameter 0
Observation arc 62.93 yr (22984 days)
Aphelion 3.3204 AU (496.72 Gm)
Perihelion 3.1108 AU (465.37 Gm)
3.2156 AU (481.05 Gm)
Eccentricity 0.032590
5.77 yr (2106.2 d)
243.57°
0° 10m 15.348s / day
Inclination 13.093°
106.50°
182.34°
Earth MOID 2.09278 AU (313.075 Gm)
Jupiter MOID 1.82509 AU (273.030 Gm)
Jupiter Tisserand parameter 3.149
Physical characteristics
Dimensions 39.3 km
Mean radius
19.64 ± 0.75 km
7.8640±0.0211 h[3]
0.0601 ± 0.005
C (assumed)[4]
11.0

2127 Tanya, provisional designation 1971 KB1, is a dark asteroid in the outer region of the asteroid belt, about 39 kilometers in diameter. It was discovered by Russian astronomer Lyudmila Chernykh at the Crimean Astrophysical Observatory in Nauchnyj on 29 May 1971.[5] The assumed carbonaceous C-type asteroid has a low geometric albedo of 0.06. It orbits the Sun at a distance of 3.1–3.3 AU once every 5 years and 9 months (2,105 days).[1]

Light curve measurements from the Palomar Transient Factory Survey, gave a rotation period of 7.8640±0.0211 hours with an amplitude of 0.18 in magnitude.[3]

Lyudmila Chernykh named her discovery in memory of the young Russian girl Tanya Savicheva, who died after the Siege of Leningrad (1941–1944) and wrote a well-known diary.[2]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c "JPL Small-Body Database Browser: 2127 Tanya (1971 KB1)" (2015-05-19 last obs.). Jet Propulsion Laboratory. Retrieved 15 April 2016. 
  2. ^ a b Schmadel, Lutz D. (2003). Dictionary of Minor Planet Names – (2127) Tanya. Springer Berlin Heidelberg. p. 172. ISBN 978-3-540-29925-7. Retrieved 23 August 2016. 
  3. ^ a b Waszczak, Adam; Chang, Chan-Kao; Ofek, Eran O.; Laher, Russ; Masci, Frank; Levitan, David; et al. (September 2015). "Asteroid Light Curves from the Palomar Transient Factory Survey: Rotation Periods and Phase Functions from Sparse Photometry". The Astronomical Journal. 150 (3): 35. arXiv:1504.04041Freely accessible. Bibcode:2015AJ....150...75W. doi:10.1088/0004-6256/150/3/75. Retrieved 23 August 2016. 
  4. ^ "LCDB Data for (2127) Tanya". Asteroid Lightcurve Database (LCDB). Retrieved 23 August 2016. 
  5. ^ "2127 Tanya (1971 KB1)". Minor Planet Center. Retrieved 23 August 2016. 

External links[edit]