212 Medea

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212 Medea
Discovery
Discovered by Johann Palisa
Discovery date 6 February 1880
Designations
Named after
Medea
1930 FW
Main belt
Orbital characteristics[1]
Epoch 31 July 2016 (JD 2457600.5)
Uncertainty parameter 0
Observation arc 136.05 yr (49694 d)
Aphelion 3.4422 AU (514.95 Gm)
Perihelion 2.78929 AU (417.272 Gm)
3.11575 AU (466.110 Gm)
Eccentricity 0.10478
5.50 yr (2008.8 d)
16.88 km/s
28.1280°
0° 10m 45.156s / day
Inclination 4.2636°
313.478°
100.91°
Earth MOID 1.80323 AU (269.759 Gm)
Jupiter MOID 1.89278 AU (283.156 Gm)
Jupiter Tisserand parameter 3.205
Physical characteristics
Dimensions 136.12±2.5 km[1]
144.13 ± 7.23 km[2]
Mass (1.32 ± 0.10) × 1019 kg[2]
Mean density
8.41 ± 1.43 g/cm3[2]
10.283 h (0.4285 d)[1]
10.12 h[3]
0.0465±0.002
DCX:[3]
8.28

212 Medea is a very large main-belt asteroid that was discovered by Johann Palisa on February 6, 1880, in Pola, and was named after Medea, a figure in Greek mythology.[4]

Photometric observations of this asteroid in 1987 gave an incomplete light curve with a period of 10.12 ± 0.06 hours and a brightness variation of 0.13 in magnitude. This object has a spectrum that matches a DCX: classification.[3] Lightcurve data has also been recorded by observers at the Antelope Hill Observatory, which has been designated as an official observatory by the Minor Planet Center. They found a period of 10.283 hours with a brightness variation of 0.08 magnitude.[5]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c Yeomans, Donald K., "212 Medea", JPL Small-Body Database Browser, NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory, retrieved 12 May 2016. 
  2. ^ a b c Carry, B. (December 2012), "Density of asteroids", Planetary and Space Science, 73, pp. 98–118, arXiv:1203.4336free to read, Bibcode:2012P&SS...73...98C, doi:10.1016/j.pss.2012.03.009.  See Table 1.
  3. ^ a b c di Martino, M.; et al. (July 1995), "Intermediate size asteroids: Photoelectric photometry of 8 objects.", Astronomy and Astrophysics Supplement, 112, pp. 1–7, Bibcode:1995A&AS..112....1D. 
  4. ^ Schmadel Lutz D. Dictionary of Minor Planet Names (fifth edition), Springer, 2003. ISBN 3-540-00238-3.
  5. ^ Lightcurve Results

External links[edit]