2139 Makharadze

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2139 Makharadze
Discovery [1]
Discovered by T. Smirnova
Discovery site Crimean Astrophysical Obs.
Discovery date 30 June 1970
Designations
MPC designation (2139) Makharadze
Named after
Ozurgeti (Georgian city)[2]
1970 MC · 1928 TF
1955 SS1 · 1955 UA1
1970 PJ · 1974 QN
1977 ER1 · A924 RB
main-belt · Nysa[3]
Orbital characteristics[1]
Epoch 4 September 2017 (JD 2458000.5)
Uncertainty parameter 0
Observation arc 91.98 yr (33,594 days)
Aphelion 2.9242 AU
Perihelion 1.9997 AU
2.4619 AU
Eccentricity 0.1878
3.86 yr (1,411 days)
54.791°
0° 15m 18.36s / day
Inclination 2.1801°
256.16°
67.561°
Physical characteristics
Dimensions 8 km (calculated)[3]
17.240±0.092 km[4]
11.9759 h[3]
0.045±0.007[4]
Tholen = F[1] · F[3]
B–V = 0.653[1]
U–B = 0.231[1]
12.80[1][3]

2139 Makharadze, provisional designation 1970 MC, is a rare-type Nysa asteroid from the inner region of the asteroid belt, approximately 14 kilometers in diameter. It was discovered on 30 June 1970, by Russian astronomer Tamara Smirnova at the Crimean Astrophysical Observatory in Nauchnyj.[5]

Orbit and classification[edit]

Makharadze belongs to the Nysa family of asteroids. It orbits the Sun in the inner main-belt at a distance of 2.0–2.9 AU once every 3 years and 10 months (1,411 days). Its orbit has an eccentricity of 0.19 and an inclination of 2° with respect to the ecliptic.[1]

Physical characteristics[edit]

In the Tholen classification, Makharadze is a F-type asteroid.[1] It has a rotation period of 11.9759 hours with a brightness variation of 0.38 magnitude.[3]

Naming[edit]

This minor planet was named after the Georgian city of Ozurgeti, formerly known as Makharadze. Makharadze is the twin city of Genichesk, Tamara Smirnova's Ukrainian birthplace.[2] The approved naming citation was published on 8 February 1982 (M.P.C. 6647).[6]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f g h "JPL Small-Body Database Browser: 2139 Makharadze (1970 MC)" (2016-08-27 last obs.). Jet Propulsion Laboratory. Retrieved 19 June 2017. 
  2. ^ a b Schmadel, Lutz D. (2007). Dictionary of Minor Planet Names – (2139) Makharadze. Springer Berlin Heidelberg. p. 173. ISBN 978-3-540-00238-3. Retrieved 19 June 2017. 
  3. ^ a b c d e f "LCDB Data for (2139) Makharadze". Asteroid Lightcurve Database (LCDB). Retrieved 19 June 2017. 
  4. ^ a b Masiero, Joseph R.; Grav, T.; Mainzer, A. K.; Nugent, C. R.; Bauer, J. M.; Stevenson, R.; et al. (August 2014). "Main-belt Asteroids with WISE/NEOWISE: Near-infrared Albedos". The Astrophysical Journal. 791 (2): 11. Bibcode:2014ApJ...791..121M. arXiv:1406.6645Freely accessible. doi:10.1088/0004-637X/791/2/121. Retrieved 19 June 2017. 
  5. ^ "2139 Makharadze (1970 MC)". Minor Planet Center. Retrieved 19 June 2017. 
  6. ^ "MPC/MPO/MPS Archive". Minor Planet Center. Retrieved 19 June 2017. 

External links[edit]