213 Lilaea

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213 Lilaea
Discovery
Discovered by C. H. F. Peters
Discovery date 16 February 1880
Designations
MPC designation (213) Lilaea
Named after
Lilaea
1950 TE3
Main belt
Orbital characteristics[1]
Epoch 31 July 2016 (JD 2457600.5)
Uncertainty parameter 0
Observation arc 136.08 yr (49704 d)
Aphelion 3.1538 AU (471.80 Gm)
Perihelion 2.34961 AU (351.497 Gm)
2.75172 AU (411.651 Gm)
Eccentricity 0.14613
4.56 yr (1667.3 d)
17.95 km/s
199.50°
0° 12m 57.312s / day
Inclination 6.8028°
122.113°
162.34°
Earth MOID 1.334 AU (199.6 Gm)
Jupiter MOID 2.00332 AU (299.692 Gm)
Jupiter Tisserand parameter 3.320
Physical characteristics
Dimensions 83.01±2.6 km
8.045 h (0.3352 d)[1][2]
0.0897±0.006
F[2]
8.64

213 Lilaea is a large main belt asteroid. It was discovered by German-American astronomer C. H. F. Peters on February 16, 1880 in Clinton, New York and was named after Lilaea, a Naiad in Greek mythology.

Photometric observations of this asteroid in 1986 gave a light curve with a period of 8.045 ± 0.008 hours and a brightness variation of 0.20 ± 0.01 in magnitude. The curve is asymmetrical with two distinct minima. This object has a spectrum that matches an F-type asteroid classification.[2] As with C-type asteroids, its composition is primitive and rich in carbon.

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Yeomans, Donald K., "213 Lilaea", JPL Small-Body Database Browser, NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory, retrieved 12 May 2016. 
  2. ^ a b c di Martino, M.; et al. (July 1995), "Intermediate size asteroids: Photoelectric photometry of 8 objects.", Astronomy and Astrophysics Supplement, 112, pp. 1–7, Bibcode:1995A&AS..112....1D. 

External links[edit]