2151 Hadwiger

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2151 Hadwiger
Discovery [1]
Discovered by P. Wild
Discovery site Zimmerwald Obs.
Discovery date 3 November 1977
Designations
MPC designation (2151) Hadwiger
Named after
Hugo Hadwiger[2]
1977 VX · 1932 UC
1940 SB · 1963 FF
1969 UU2 · 1973 SQ6
1975 EA
main-belt
Orbital characteristics[1]
Epoch 4 September 2017 (JD 2458000.5)
Uncertainty parameter 0
Observation arc 83.16 yr (30,374 days)
Aphelion|Aphelion 2.7071 AU
Perihelion|Perihelion 2.4145 AU
2.5608 AU
Eccentricity 0.0571
4.10 yr (1,497 days)
177.54°
0° 14m 25.8s / day
Inclination 15.487°
27.926°
86.794°
Physical characteristics
Dimensions 13.767±0.540[3]
5.872±0.002[4]
2.29±0.01 h[5]
0.446±0.058[3]
Tholen = CSU [1] · C[6]
11.0[1]

2151 Hadwiger, provisional designation 1977 VX, is a rare-type asteroid from the central region of the asteroid belt, approximately 15 kilometers in diameter. It was discovered on 3 November 1977, by Swiss astronomer Paul Wild at Zimmerwald Observatory near Bern, Switzerland.[7]

Orbit and characterization[edit]

Hadwiger orbits the Sun at a distance of 2.4–2.7 AU once every 4 years and 1 month (1,497 days). Its orbit has an eccentricity of 0.06 and an inclination of 15° with respect to the ecliptic.[1] It is a member of the Maria family of asteroids.[5]

In the Tholen classification, Hadwiger is a carbonaceous CSU-type.[1] It has a rotation period of hours with a brightness variation of in magnitude.[4]

Naming[edit]

This minor planet was named in memory of Swiss mathematician Hugo Hadwiger (1908–1981), professor at the University of Berne for more than 40 years and very popular for his refined art of presentation.[2] The approved naming citation was published by the Minor Planet Center on 22 September 1983 (M.P.C. 8151).[8]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f "JPL Small-Body Database Browser: 2151 Hadwiger (1977 VX)" (2017-05-04 last obs.). Jet Propulsion Laboratory. Retrieved 19 June 2017. 
  2. ^ a b Schmadel, Lutz D. (2007). Dictionary of Minor Planet Names – (2151) Hadwiger. Springer Berlin Heidelberg. p. 174. ISBN 978-3-540-00238-3. Retrieved 19 June 2017. 
  3. ^ a b Masiero, Joseph R.; Mainzer, A. K.; Grav, T.; Bauer, J. M.; Cutri, R. M.; Nugent, C.; et al. (November 2012). "Preliminary Analysis of WISE/NEOWISE 3-Band Cryogenic and Post-cryogenic Observations of Main Belt Asteroids". The Astrophysical Journal Letters. 759 (1): 5. arXiv:1209.5794Freely accessible. Bibcode:2012ApJ...759L...8M. doi:10.1088/2041-8205/759/1/L8. Retrieved 19 June 2017. 
  4. ^ a b Sada, Pedro V.; Canizales, Eder D.; Armada, Edgar M. (December 2005). "CCD photometry of asteroids 651 Antikleia, 738 Alagasta, and 2151 Hadwiger using a remote commercial telescope". The Minor Planet Bulletin. 32 (4): 73–75. Bibcode:2005MPBu...32...73S. ISSN 1052-8091. Retrieved 19 June 2017. 
  5. ^ a b Alvarez-Candal, Alvaro; et al. (December 2004), "Rotational lightcurves of asteroids belonging to families", Icarus, 172 (2): 388–401, Bibcode:2004Icar..172..388A, doi:10.1016/j.icarus.2004.06.008. 
  6. ^ "LCDB Data for (2151) Hadwiger". Asteroid Lightcurve Database (LCDB). Retrieved 19 June 2017. 
  7. ^ "2151 Hadwiger (1977 VX)". Minor Planet Center. Retrieved 19 June 2017. 
  8. ^ "MPC/MPO/MPS Archive". Minor Planet Center. Retrieved 19 June 2017. 

External links[edit]