219 Thusnelda

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219 Thusnelda
Discovery
Discovered by Johann Palisa
Discovery date 30 September 1880
Designations
MPC designation (219) Thusnelda
Named after
Thusnelda
Main belt
Orbital characteristics[1]
Epoch 31 July 2016 (JD 2457600.5)
Uncertainty parameter 0
Observation arc 117.58 yr (42947 d)
Aphelion 2.8796 AU (430.78 Gm)
Perihelion 1.8302 AU (273.79 Gm)
2.3549 AU (352.29 Gm)
Eccentricity 0.22281
3.61 yr (1319.9 d)
19.41 km/s
238.118°
0° 16m 21.864s / day
Inclination 10.861°
200.821°
142.692°
Earth MOID 0.835713 AU (125.0209 Gm)
Jupiter MOID 2.59182 AU (387.731 Gm)
Jupiter Tisserand parameter 3.498
Physical characteristics
Dimensions 40.56±2.7 km[1]
38.279 km[2]
59.74 h (2.489 d)
0.2009±0.030[1]
0.2214 ± 0.0471[2]
S[2] (Tholen)
9.32,[1] 9.34[2]

219 Thusnelda is a typical S-type Main belt asteroid. It was discovered by Johann Palisa on September 30, 1880, in Pola and was named after Thusnelda, wife of Germanic warrior Arminius.

In 1982, the asteroid was observed using photometry from the La Silla Observatory to generate a composite light curve. The resulting data showed a rotation period of 1.24 days (29.8 h) with a brightness variation of 0.2 in magnitude.[3]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d "219 Thusnelda". JPL Small-Body Database. NASA/Jet Propulsion Laboratory. Retrieved 12 May 2016. 
  2. ^ a b c d Pravec, P.; et al. (May 2012), "Absolute Magnitudes of Asteroids and a Revision of Asteroid Albedo Estimates from WISE Thermal Observations", Asteroids, Comets, Meteors 2012, Proceedings of the conference held May 16–20, 2012 in Niigata, Japan (1667), Bibcode:2012LPICo1667.6089P.  See Table 4.
  3. ^ Lagerkvist, C.-I.; Kamel, L. (December 1982), "Physical studies of asteroids. X - Photoelectric light curves of the asteroids 219 and 512", Moon and the Planets, 27: 463–466, Bibcode:1982M&P....27..463L, doi:10.1007/BF00929999. 

External links[edit]