21 cm Mörser 10

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to navigation Jump to search
21 cm Mörser 10
Victoria-Barracks-21-cm-Morser-10-2.jpg
21 cm Mörser 10 near Victoria Barracks, Melbourne, Australia.
TypeHowitzer
Place of originGerman Empire
Service history
Used byGerman Empire
WarsWorld War I
Production history
DesignerKrupp
Specifications
Weight15,496 lb (7,029 kg)
Barrel length2.57 m (8 ft 5 in) L/12

Shell252 pounds (114 kg)
Caliber211 mm (8.3 in)
Breechhorizontal sliding-wedge
Recoilhydro-pneumatic
Carriagebox trail
Elevation-6° to +70°
Traverse
Muzzle velocity335 m/s (1,101 ft/s)
Maximum firing range9,400 m (10,300 yd)

The 21 cm Mörser 10 (21 cm Mrs 10) was a heavy howitzer used by Germany in World War I (although classified as a mortar (Mörser) by the German military). It replaced the obsolete 21 cm Mörser 99, which lacked a recoil system. For transport, it broke down into two loads. Some howitzers were fitted with a Gun shield during the war. As it was also intended for siege use, a concrete-penetrating shell was also used. Unusually, it had two spades: a folding one halfway down the trail and a fixed one at the end of the trail.

Before the 21 cm Mörser 10 was commissioned for mass production, a small test series of 21 cm Versuchmörser 06 ("test mortar") was given to the German army. Eight pieces equipped two batteries, but their range of only 7 km was found insufficient, so the range was increased for the production version. Serial number 3 of these rare pieces is now exposed at Red Cliffs, Victoria.[1]

216 were in service at the beginning of the war.[2] It was replaced by the 21 cm Mörser 16, which was also known as the langer 21 cm Mörser since it was merely a lighter 21 cm Mrs 10 with a longer barrel for extra range and other refinements.

The specifications provided for this weapon by difference sources are contradictory and, thus, those given here cannot be regarded as authoritative.

Gallery[edit]

See also[edit]

Weapons of comparable role, performance and era[edit]

References[edit]

  • Hogg, Ian. Twentieth-Century Artillery. New York: Barnes & Noble Books, 2000 ISBN 0-7607-1994-2
  • Jäger, Herbert. German Artillery of World War One. Ramsbury, Marlborough, Wiltshire: Crowood Press, 2001 ISBN 1-86126-403-8

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ http://canonspgmww1guns.canalblog.com/archives/2011/01/13/20119317.html
  2. ^ Jäger, p. 29
  3. ^ Emery, Max (27 November 2014). "History behind Childers' cannon". Bundaberg News-Mail. Archived from the original on 23 March 2015. Retrieved 29 May 2018.
  4. ^ "Claim 210 mm Howitzer Morser M10 c 1916 – Isis District War Memorial & Shire Council Chambers c 1926, Childers, QLD". Retrieved 29 May 2018.
  5. ^ "Surviving Gun File (# 30)". Database of the WW1 surviving artillery. Archived from the original on 29 May 2018. Retrieved 29 May 2018.

Further reading[edit]

External links[edit]