2204 Lyyli

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2204 Lyyli
Discovery [1]
Discovered by Y. Väisälä
Discovery site Turku Obs.
Discovery date 3 March 1943
Designations
MPC designation (2204) Lyyli
Named after
Lyyli Heinänen (Esperantist)[2]
1943 EQ · 1968 DN
Mars-crosser[1][3]
Orbital characteristics[1]
Epoch 4 September 2017 (JD 2458000.5)
Uncertainty parameter 0
Observation arc 73.75 yr (26,937 days)
Aphelion 3.6435 AU
Perihelion 1.5354 AU
2.5894 AU
Eccentricity 0.4071
4.17 yr (1,522 days)
350.25°
Inclination 20.561°
160.45°
283.25°
Earth MOID 0.6872 AU
Physical characteristics
Dimensions 25.16±2.4 km (IRAS:11)[4]
25.27 km (derived)[5]
27.12±1.31 km[6]
9.51±0.01 h[7]
10 h[8]
11.063±0.001 h[9]
11.09±0.01 h[10]
0.020±0.002[6]
0.0232±0.005 (IRAS:11)[4]
0.050±0.006[11]
0.0537 (derived)[5]
SMASS = X[1] · P[11] · X[5]
11.61±0.44[12] · 11.78[5] · 12.1[1] · 12.70[4][6]

2204 Lyyli, provisional designation 1943 EQ, is a dark asteroid and very eccentric Mars-crosser from the middle region of the asteroid belt, approximately 25 kilometers in diameter. It was discovered on 3 March 1943 by Finnish astronomer Yrjö Väisälä at Turku Observatory in Southwest Finland.[3]

Orbit and classification[edit]

Lyyli orbits the Sun in the central main-belt at a distance of 1.5–3.6 AU once every 4 years and 2 months (1,522 days). Its orbit has an eccentricity of 0.41 and an inclination of 21° with respect to the ecliptic.[1]

Physical characteristics[edit]

Lyyli is a X-type asteroid in the SMASS classification.[1] It has also been characterized as a P-type asteroid by NASA's NEOWISE mission.[11]

It has a rotation period of 11 hours[9] and a very low albedo between 0.02 and 0.05, according to the surveys carried out by IRAS, Akari, and WISE/NEOWISE.[4][6][11]

Other large Mars crossing minor planets include 132 Aethra and 323 Brucia, with diameters of 43 and 36 kilometers, respectively.

Naming[edit]

This minor planet was named in honour of Lyyli Heinänen (1903–1988), née Hartonen, a Finnish female Esperantist, professor of mathematics, amateur astronomer and former assistant of the discoverer.[2] The official naming citation was published by the Minor Planet Center on 26 May 1983 (M.P.C. 7944).[13]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f g "JPL Small-Body Database Browser: 2204 Lyyli (1943 EQ)" (2016-12-01 last obs.). Jet Propulsion Laboratory. Retrieved 12 June 2017. 
  2. ^ a b Schmadel, Lutz D. (2007). Dictionary of Minor Planet Names – (2204) Lyyli. Springer Berlin Heidelberg. p. 179. ISBN 978-3-540-00238-3. Retrieved 7 December 2016. 
  3. ^ a b "2204 Lyyli (1943 EQ)". Minor Planet Center. Retrieved 7 December 2016. 
  4. ^ a b c d Tedesco, E. F.; Noah, P. V.; Noah, M.; Price, S. D. (October 2004). "IRAS Minor Planet Survey V6.0". NASA Planetary Data System. Bibcode:2004PDSS...12.....T. Retrieved 7 December 2016. 
  5. ^ a b c d "LCDB Data for (2204) Lyyli". Asteroid Lightcurve Database (LCDB). Retrieved 7 December 2016. 
  6. ^ a b c d Usui, Fumihiko; Kuroda, Daisuke; Müller, Thomas G.; Hasegawa, Sunao; Ishiguro, Masateru; Ootsubo, Takafumi; et al. (October 2011). "Asteroid Catalog Using Akari: AKARI/IRC Mid-Infrared Asteroid Survey" (PDF). Publications of the Astronomical Society of Japan. 63 (5): 1117–1138. Bibcode:2011PASJ...63.1117U. doi:10.1093/pasj/63.5.1117. Retrieved 7 December 2016. 
  7. ^ Gil-Hutton, R.; Cañ; ada, M. (April 2003). "Photometry of Fourteen Main Belt Asteroids". Revista Mexicana de Astronomía y Astrofísica Vol. 39: 69–76(http://www.astroscu.unam.mx/~rmaa/)(RMxAAHomepage). Bibcode:2003RMxAA..39...69G. Retrieved 7 December 2016. 
  8. ^ Mohamed, R. A.; Krugly, Yu. N.; Velichko, F. P. (April 1994). "Photometry of two Mars-crossing asteroids 2078 Nanking and 2204 Lyyli". Planetary and Space Science: 341–343. Bibcode:1994P&SS...42..341M. doi:10.1016/0032-0633(94)90107-4. Retrieved 7 December 2016. 
  9. ^ a b Warner, Brian D. (October 2010). "Asteroid Lightcurve Analysis at the Palmer Divide Observatory: 2010 March - June". The Minor Planet Bulletin. 37 (4): 161–165. Bibcode:2010MPBu...37..161W. ISSN 1052-8091. Retrieved 7 December 2016. 
  10. ^ Warner, Brian D. (January 2016). "Asteroid Lightcurve Analysis at CS3-Palmer Divide Station: 2015 June-September". The Minor Planet Bulletin. 43 (1): 57–65. Bibcode:2016MPBu...43...57W. ISSN 1052-8091. Retrieved 7 December 2016. 
  11. ^ a b c d Mainzer, A.; Grav, T.; Masiero, J.; Hand, E.; Bauer, J.; Tholen, D.; et al. (November 2011). "NEOWISE Studies of Spectrophotometrically Classified Asteroids: Preliminary Results". The Astrophysical Journal. 741 (2): 25. Bibcode:2011ApJ...741...90M. arXiv:1109.6407Freely accessible. doi:10.1088/0004-637X/741/2/90. Retrieved 2 May 2016. 
  12. ^ Veres, Peter; Jedicke, Robert; Fitzsimmons, Alan; Denneau, Larry; Granvik, Mikael; Bolin, Bryce; et al. (November 2015). "Absolute magnitudes and slope parameters for 250,000 asteroids observed by Pan-STARRS PS1 - Preliminary results". Icarus. 261: 34–47. Bibcode:2015Icar..261...34V. arXiv:1506.00762Freely accessible. doi:10.1016/j.icarus.2015.08.007. Retrieved 7 December 2016. 
  13. ^ "MPC/MPO/MPS Archive". Minor Planet Center. Retrieved 7 December 2016. 

External links[edit]