2228 Soyuz-Apollo

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2228 Soyuz-Apollo
Discovery [1]
Discovered by N. Chernykh
Discovery site CrAO (Nauchnyj)
Discovery date 19 July 1977
Designations
MPC designation 2228 Soyuz-Apollo
Named after
Apollo-Soyuz Test Project[2]
1977 OH · 1933 SK1
1952 DT1 · 1963 DD
1973 YN3
main-belt · Themis[3]
Orbital characteristics[1]
Epoch 13 January 2016 (JD 2457400.5)
Uncertainty parameter 0
Observation arc 52.32 yr (19111 days)
Aphelion 3.7131 AU (555.47 Gm)
Perihelion 2.5589 AU (382.81 Gm)
3.1360 AU (469.14 Gm)
Eccentricity 0.18401
5.55 yr (2028.4 d)
235.15°
0° 10m 38.928s / day
Inclination 1.9889°
140.41°
285.83°
Earth MOID 1.57274 AU (235.279 Gm)
Jupiter MOID 1.61248 AU (241.224 Gm)
Jupiter Tisserand parameter 3.184
Physical characteristics
Dimensions 28.26±0.49 km[4]
26.080±0.295 km[5]
24.66 km (calculated)[3]
5.3846 h (0.22436 d)[6]
6.12 h[7]
5.4±0.05 h[6]
5.3868±0.0013 h[8]
0.101±0.004[4]
0.1134±0.0198[5]
0.08 (assumed)[3]
C[3]
11.4[1]

2228 Soyuz-Apollo, provisional designation 1977 OH, is a carbonaceous asteroid from the outer region of the asteroid belt, about 26 kilometers in diameter. It was discovered on 19 July 1977, by Soviet–Russian astronomer Nikolai Chernykh at the Crimean Astrophysical Observatory in Nauchnyj on the Crimean peninsula.[9]

The dark C-type asteroid is a member of the Themis family, a dynamical family of outer-belt asteroids with nearly coplanar ecliptical orbits. It orbits the Sun at a distance of 2.6–3.7 AU once every 5 years and 7 months (2,028 days). Its orbit shows an eccentricity of 0.18 and is tilted by 2 degrees to the plane of the ecliptic. It has a rotation period of 5.4 hours and an albedo of 0.10 and 0.11, as determined by the space-based Akari and WISE missions, respectively,[4][5] while the Collaborative Asteroid Lightcurve Link (CALL) assumes a somewhat lower albedo of 0.08.[3]

The minor planet was named after the joint Soviet-American space flight, the Apollo–Soyuz space program, carried on in 1975. The reversal of the names, "Soyuz–Apollo" rather than "Apollo–Soyuz", was not political, but to prevent confusion with the asteroid 1862 Apollo.[2]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c "JPL Small-Body Database Browser: 2228 Soyuz-Apollo (1977 OH)" (2015-06-21 last obs.). Jet Propulsion Laboratory. Retrieved 15 April 2016. 
  2. ^ a b Schmadel, Lutz D. (2003). Dictionary of Minor Planet Names – (2228) Soyuz-Apollo. Springer Berlin Heidelberg. p. 181. ISBN 978-3-540-29925-7. Retrieved December 2015. 
  3. ^ a b c d e "LCDB Data for (2228) Soyuz-Apollo". Asteroid Lightcurve Database (LCDB). Retrieved December 2015. 
  4. ^ a b c Usui, Fumihiko; Kuroda, Daisuke; Müller, Thomas G.; Hasegawa, Sunao; Ishiguro, Masateru; Ootsubo, Takafumi; et al. (October 2011). "Asteroid Catalog Using Akari: AKARI/IRC Mid-Infrared Asteroid Survey". Publications of the Astronomical Society of Japan 63 (5): 1117–1138. Bibcode:2011PASJ...63.1117U. doi:10.1093/pasj/63.5.1117. Retrieved December 2015. 
  5. ^ a b c Mainzer, A.; Grav, T.; Masiero, J.; Hand, E.; Bauer, J.; Tholen, D.; et al. (November 2011). "NEOWISE Studies of Spectrophotometrically Classified Asteroids: Preliminary Results". The Astrophysical Journal 741 (2): 25. arXiv:1109.6407. Bibcode:2011ApJ...741...90M. doi:10.1088/0004-637X/741/2/90. Retrieved December 2015. 
  6. ^ a b Behrend, Raoul. "Asteroids and comets rotation curves – (2228) Soyuz-Apollo". Geneva Observatory. Retrieved December 2015. 
  7. ^ Almeida, R.; Angeli, C. A.; Duffard, R.; Lazzaro, D. (February 2004). "Rotation periods for small main-belt asteroids". Astronomy and Astrophysics: 403–406. Bibcode:2004A&A...415..403A. doi:10.1051/0004-6361:20034585. Retrieved December 2015. 
  8. ^ Waszczak, Adam; Chang, Chan-Kao; Ofek, Eran O.; Laher, Russ; Masci, Frank; Levitan, David; et al. (September 2015). "Asteroid Light Curves from the Palomar Transient Factory Survey: Rotation Periods and Phase Functions from Sparse Photometry". The Astronomical Journal 150 (3): 35. arXiv:1504.04041. Bibcode:2015AJ....150...75W. doi:10.1088/0004-6256/150/3/75. Retrieved December 2015. 
  9. ^ "2228 Soyuz-Apollo (1977 OH)". Minor Planet Center. Retrieved December 2015. 

External links[edit]