228 Agathe

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228 Agathe
Discovery [1]
Discovered by J. Palisa
Discovery site Vienna Observatory
Discovery date 19 August 1882
Designations
MPC designation 228 Agathe
Named after
daughter of astronomer
Theodor v. Oppolzer[2]
main-belt
Orbital characteristics[1]
Epoch 31 July 2016 (JD 2457600.5)
Uncertainty parameter 0
Observation arc 110.45 yr (40343 d)
Aphelion 2.7345 AU (409.08 Gm)
Perihelion 1.6680 AU (249.53 Gm)
2.2013 AU (329.31 Gm)
Eccentricity 0.24224
3.27 yr (1192.9 d)
359.08°
0° 18m 6.408s / day
Inclination 2.5363°
313.36°
19.121°
Earth MOID 0.657123 AU (98.3042 Gm)
Jupiter MOID 2.62486 AU (392.673 Gm)
Jupiter Tisserand parameter 3.625
Physical characteristics
Dimensions 9.30±0.8 km
6.484 h (0.2702 d)
0.2082±0.043
B–V = 0.918
U–B = 0.596
S (Tholen), S (SMASS)
12.48

228 Agathe is a stony main belt asteroid, about 9 kilometers in diameter. It was discovered by Johann Palisa on August 19, 1882 at Vienna Observatory, Austria. Photometric observations during 2003 showed a rotation period of 6.48 ± 0.01 hours with a brightness variation of 0.27 ± 0.03 in magnitude. An earlier study yielded results that are consistent with these estimates.[3]

Agathe was named after the youngest daughter of Austrian astronomer Theodor von Oppolzer (1841–1886), professor of astronomy in Vienna.[2]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "JPL Small-Body Database Browser: 228 Agathe" (2015-06-18 last obs.). Jet Propulsion Laboratory. Retrieved 12 May 2016. 
  2. ^ a b Schmadel, Lutz D. (2003). Dictionary of Minor Planet Names – (228) Agathe. Springer Berlin Heidelberg. p. 35. ISBN 978-3-540-29925-7. Retrieved 23 August 2016. 
  3. ^ Cooney, Walter R., Jr. (March 2005), "Lightcurve results for minor planets 228 Agathe, 297 Caecilia, 744 Aguntina 1062 Ljuba, 1605 Milankovitch, and 3125 Hay", The Minor Planet Bulletin, 32 (1): 15–16, Bibcode:2005MPBu...32...15C. 

External links[edit]