231 Vindobona

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231 Vindobona
Discovery
Discovered by Johann Palisa
Discovery date 10 September 1882
Designations
Named after
Vienna
1962 UJ
Main belt
Orbital characteristics[1]
Epoch 31 July 2016 (JD 2457600.5)
Uncertainty parameter 0
Observation arc 131.05 yr (47865 d)
Aphelion 3.3648 AU (503.37 Gm)
Perihelion 2.4810 AU (371.15 Gm)
2.9229 AU (437.26 Gm)
Eccentricity 0.15120
5.00 yr (1825.2 d)
17.44 km/s
12.6140°
0° 11m 50.064s / day
Inclination 5.1021°
350.535°
268.609°
Earth MOID 1.47235 AU (220.260 Gm)
Jupiter MOID 1.7388 AU (260.12 Gm)
Jupiter Tisserand parameter 3.256
Physical characteristics
Dimensions 82.33±2.1 km
14.245 h (0.5935 d)
0.0545±0.003
9.6

231 Vindobona is a large Main belt asteroid. It was discovered by Austrian astronomer Johann Palisa on September 10, 1882. Vindobona is the Latin name for Vienna, Austria, the city where the discovery was made.

Its dark surface indicates a carbon-rich composition.

Photometric observations at the Organ Mesa Observatory in New Mexico during 2012 showed a rotation period of 14.245 ± 0.001 hours with a brightness variation of 0.20 ± 0.03 in magnitude. This is in agreement with previous results.[2]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "231 Vindobona". JPL Small-Body Database. NASA/Jet Propulsion Laboratory. Retrieved 12 May 2016. 
  2. ^ Pilcher, Frederick (April 2013), "Rotation Period Determinations for 24 Themis, 159 Aemilia 191 Kolga, 217 Eudora, 226 Weringia, 231 Vindobona, and 538 Friederike", The Minor Planet Bulletin 40 (2): 85–87, Bibcode:2013MPBu...40...85P. 

External links[edit]