23rd Street (IRT Lexington Avenue Line)

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 23 Street
 "6" train "6" express train
MTA NYC logo.svg New York City Subway rapid transit station
23 Street IRT 001.JPG
Uptown platform
Station statistics
Address East 23rd Street & Park Avenue South
New York, NY 10010
Borough Manhattan
Locale Gramercy, Flatiron District
Coordinates 40°44′25″N 73°59′11″W / 40.740169°N 73.98644°W / 40.740169; -73.98644Coordinates: 40°44′25″N 73°59′11″W / 40.740169°N 73.98644°W / 40.740169; -73.98644
Division A (IRT)
Line       IRT Lexington Avenue Line
Services       4 late nights (late nights)
      6 all times (all times) <6> weekdays until 8:45 p.m., peak direction (weekdays until 8:45 p.m., peak direction)
Transit connections Bus transport New York City Bus: M1, M2, M3, M23 SBS, SIM3, SIM6, SIM6X, SIM10, SIM31
Bus transport MTA Bus: BM1, BM2, BM3, BM4, QM21
Structure Underground
Platforms 2 side platforms
Tracks 4
Other information
Opened October 27, 1904 (113 years ago) (1904-10-27)[1]
Station code 405[2]
Accessible This station is compliant with the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 ADA-accessible
Wireless service Wi-Fi and cellular service is provided at this station[3][4]
Traffic
Passengers (2017) 8,265,227[5]Decrease 3.2%
Rank 42 out of 425
Station succession
Next north 33rd Street: 4 late nights6 all times <6> weekdays until 8:45 p.m., peak direction
28th Street: ZZZtemporarily closed for construction
Next south 18th Street (closed): no service
14th Street–Union Square: 4 late nights6 all times <6> weekdays until 8:45 p.m., peak direction


Next adjacent station compliant with the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 north Grand Central–42nd Street: 4 late nights6 all times <6> weekdays until 8:45 p.m., peak direction
Next adjacent station compliant with the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 south Bleecker Street: 4 late nights6 all times <6> weekdays until 8:45 p.m., peak direction

23rd Street is a local station on the IRT Lexington Avenue Line of the New York City Subway. Located at the intersection of Park Avenue South and 23rd Street in Manhattan,[6] it is served by 6 trains at all times, <6> trains during weekdays in the peak direction, and 4 trains during late night hours.

History[edit]

Track layout

Construction started on the first IRT line in 1900.[7] The part of the line from City Hall to just south of 42nd Street was part of the original IRT line, opened on October 27, 1904, including a local station at 23rd Street.[1]

On April 13, 1948, the platform extensions to accommodate ten-car trains at this station along with those at 28th Street, and 33rd Street were opened for use.[8]

In 1981, the MTA listed the station among the 69 most deteriorated stations in the subway system.[9]

In late 2014, construction began to install ADA-accessible elevators in the station. To make room for the elevator that serves the northbound platform, the northbound staircase on the northeastern corner of Park Avenue South and 23rd Street had to be demolished, and rebuilt/relocated a few feet down the street.[10] The relocated staircase opened in August 2015. The construction was completed in December 2016 making the station fully ADA-compliant.[11]

Station layout[edit]

G Street Level Exit/Entrance
Handicapped/disabled access (Elevators at NE corner of 23rd Street and Park Avenue S for northbound "4" train"6" train "6" express train service, and at NW corner for southbound "4" train"6" train "6" express train service)
P
Platform level
Side platform, doors will open on the right Handicapped/disabled access
Northbound local "6" train ("6" express train PM rush) toward Pelham Bay Park, "6" train (rush hours and middays) toward Parkchester (33rd Street (temporarily closed: 28th Street))
"4" train toward Woodlawn late nights (33rd Street (temporarily closed: 28th Street))
Northbound express "4" train "5" train do not stop here
Southbound express "4" train "5" train do not stop here →
Southbound local "6" train ("6" express train AM rush) toward Brooklyn Bridge–City Hall (14th Street–Union Square (no service: 18th Street))
"4" train toward New Lots Avenue late nights (14th Street–Union Square (no service: 18th Street))
Side platform, doors will open on the right Handicapped/disabled access

This is a typical local station with four tracks and two side platforms. During station renovations in 1988, the beige tiles were removed and the original white ones restored. It has IND-style signs indicating the way to 22nd and 23rd Streets. An ornate fare control grille on the southbound side is a piece of artwork entitled Long Division by artist Valerie Jaudon, which was installed during the renovation. The station features a back-lit "23 Street/Park Avenue South" sign at the platform level fare control. There is a low tiled wall at the 22nd Street end which is probably a remnant of a closed crossunder.

The station features modern features such as emergency communication systems, vendors on both south and north bound sides, and Wi-Fi, connecting the communications system with the NYPD Emergency direct line. The station does not contain restrooms.

Exits[edit]

The station has 2 elevator entrances, one to each platform, as well as 6 staircases to the southbound platform and 5 to the northbound platform.

Exit location[12] Number of exits Platform served
320 Park Avenue South
(west side between 23rd and 24th Streets)
1 Southbound (open 7am – 7pm, weekdays)
NW corner of Park Avenue S and 23rd Street, in the Metropolitan Life Insurance Company Tower 2 Southbound
SW corner of Park Avenue S and 23rd Street 2 Southbound
NE corner of Park Avenue S and 23rd Street 2 Northbound
SE corner of Park Avenue S and 23rd Street 2 Northbound
NW corner of Park Avenue S and 22nd Street 1 Southbound
SW corner of Park Avenue S and 22nd Street 1 Southbound
NE corner of Park Avenue S and 22nd Street 1 Northbound
SE corner of Park Avenue S and 22nd Street 1 Northbound

Image gallery[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "Our Subway Open: 150,000 Try It". The New York Times. October 28, 1904 – via nycsubway.org. 
  2. ^ "Station Developers' Information". Metropolitan Transportation Authority. Retrieved June 13, 2017. 
  3. ^ "NYC Subway Wireless – Active Stations". Transit Wireless Wifi. Retrieved May 18, 2016.
  4. ^ Attached PDF to "Governor Cuomo Announces Wireless Service and New "Transit Wireless WiFi" in Queens and Manhattan Subway Stations", governor.ny.gov
  5. ^ "Facts and Figures: Annual Subway Ridership 2012–2017". Metropolitan Transportation Authority. July 12, 2018. Retrieved July 12, 2018. 
  6. ^ C.J. Hughes (2018-01-31). "Living In / Park Avenue South: The Other Park Avenue Comes Into Its Own". New York Times. Mail was occasionally delivered to the wrong addresses — to that other Park Avenue, residents said — and the street appeared to be trapped in real-estate limbo. It was neither here nor there, brushing by brand-name enclaves like Gramercy Park and Flatiron, but not belonging to them, and never really developing a personality of its own. ... With the 6 train directly under Park Avenue South, subway service is never far, although the trains can get jammed. Stops are at East 28th Street and East 23rd Street, and just outside the neighborhood at East 33rd Street and 14th Street‑Union Square, where other lines meet. 
  7. ^ "www.nycsubway.org". www.nycsubway.org. 
  8. ^ Report for the three and one-half years ending June 30, 1949. New York City Board of Transportation. 1949. 
  9. ^ Gargan, Edward A. (June 11, 1981). "AGENCY LISTS ITS 69 MOST DETERIORATED SUBWAY STATIONS". The New York Times. Retrieved 13 August 2016. 
  10. ^ http://www.flatirondistrict.nyc/uploaded/files/PDFs/23rd_Street_ADA_Elevator.pdf
  11. ^ http://web.mta.info/capitaldashboard/allframenew_head.html?PROJNUM=t6041310&PLTYPE=1
  12. ^ "MTA Neighborhood Maps: Union Square / Gramercy" (PDF). Metropolitan Transportation Authority. 2015. Retrieved August 6, 2015. 

External links[edit]