240s

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Millennium: 1st millennium
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The 240s decade ran from January 1, 240, to December 31, 249.

Events

240

By place[edit]

Roman Empire[edit]
Persia[edit]
India[edit]

By topic[edit]

Religion[edit]
  • Mani, a young mystic of Ctesiphon, proclaims himself a prophet at the court of Ardashir I. He preaches his doctrine, Manichaeism, throughout the Sassanid Empire.

241

By place[edit]

Roman Empire[edit]
Persia[edit]
Europe[edit]

By topic[edit]

Religion[edit]

242

By place[edit]

Roman Empire[edit]
  • Emperor Gordian III begins a campaign against King Shapur I; Greek philosopher Plotinus joins him, hoping to obtain first-hand knowledge of Persian and Indian philosophies.
  • Gordian III evacuates the Cimmerian cities in the Bosphorus (Crimea), as the territory is now controlled by the Goths.
Persia[edit]
  • Shapur I makes a pre-emptive attack on Antioch to drive out the Romans. Gordian's father-in-law, Timesitheus, leads a Roman army to defeat the Sassanids at Carrhae and Nisibis.
  • King Ardashir I, founder of the Sassanid Empire, dies after a 30-year reign. He is succeeded by his son and co-ruler Shapur I.

By topic[edit]

Religion[edit]

243

By place[edit]

Roman Empire[edit]
Asia[edit]
  • Fan Chan of Funan sends a tribute mission to China (approximate date).

244

By place[edit]

Roman Empire[edit]
Asia[edit]
Korea[edit]

By topic[edit]

Art and Science[edit]
Commerce[edit]
  • The silver content of the Roman denarius falls to 0.5 percent under emperor Philippus I, down from 28 percent under Gordian III.
Religion[edit]

245

By place[edit]

Roman Empire[edit]
Asia[edit]

246

By place[edit]

Roman Empire[edit]
Korea[edit]

247

By place[edit]

Roman Empire[edit]
Asia[edit]

248

By place[edit]

Roman Empire[edit]
Asia[edit]

By topic[edit]

Religion[edit]

249

By place[edit]

Roman Empire[edit]
Asia[edit]

By topic[edit]

Religion[edit]
  • In Alexandria, the populace pillages the homes of Christians.

Significant people[edit]

Births[edit]

240

241

242

243

244

245

246

247

248

249

  • Shi Chong (or Jilun), Chinese politician and statesman

Deaths[edit]

240

241

242

243

  • Gu Yong (or Yuantan), Chinese official and politician (b. 168)
  • Hu Zong (or Weize), Chinese official and general (b. 183)
  • Timesitheus, Roman advisor and praetorian prefect (b. 190)
  • Xue Zong (or Jingwen), Chinese official, politician and poet

244

245

  • Ammonius Saccas, Alexandrian-Greek philosopher (approximate date)
  • Lu Xun (or Boyan), Chinese general and statesman (b. 183)
  • Wu (or Wu Xian), Chinese empress of the Shu Han state
  • Wu Can (or Kongxiu), Chinese official and politician
  • Zhao Yan (or Boran), Chinese official and general (b. 171)
  • Zhang Xiu (or Shusi), Chinese general and statesman (b. 205)

246

  • Dong Yun (or Xiuzhao), Chinese general and politician
  • Gu Tan (or Zimo), Chinese official and politician (b. 205)
  • Jiang Wan (or Gongyan), Chinese general and statesman

247

248

249

References[edit]

  1. ^ Stratton, J. M. (1969). Agricultural Records. London: John Baker. ISBN 0-212-97022-4.
  2. ^ Walker, Brett L. (2015). A Concise History of Japan. Cambridge University Press. p. 18. ISBN 9781107004184.
  3. ^ "List of Rulers of Korea". www.metmuseum.org. Retrieved 21 April 2019.
  4. ^ "List of Rulers of Korea". www.metmuseum.org. Retrieved 18 April 2019.
  5. ^ Song, Geng (2004). The Fragile Scholar: Power and Masculinity in Chinese Culture. Hong Kong University Press. p. 143. ISBN 9789622096202.
  6. ^ Biographical Dictionary of Chinese Women: Antiquity Through Sui, 1600 B.C.E.-618 C.E. M.E. Sharpe. 1998. p. 272. ISBN 9780765641823.
  7. ^ Chen, Shou (300). Records of the Three Kingdoms (Sanguozhi ed.). China.