24th Legislative District (New Jersey)

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New Jersey's 24th Legislative District
New Jersey Legislative Districts Map (2011) D24 hl.svg
Senator Steve Oroho (R)
Assembly members Parker Space (R)
Gail Phoebus (R)
Registration
Demographics
Population 215,703
Voting-age population 161,998
Registered voters 151,744

New Jersey's 24th Legislative District is one of 40 in the New Jersey Legislature. As of the 2011 apportionment, the district includes the Morris County municipality of Mount Olive Township; the Sussex County municipalities of Andover Borough, Andover Township, Branchville Borough, Byram Township, Frankford Township, Franklin Borough, Fredon Township, Green Township, Hamburg Borough, Hampton Township, Hardyston Township, Hopatcong Borough, Lafayette Township, Montague Township, Newton Town, Ogdensburg Borough, Sandyston Township, Sparta Township, Stanhope Borough, Stillwater Township, Sussex Borough, Vernon Township, Walpack Township and Wantage Township; and the Warren County municipalities of Allamuchy Township, Belvidere Town, Blairstown Township, Frelinghuysen Township, Hardwick Township, Hope Township, Independence Township, Knowlton Township, Liberty Township, Oxford Township and White Township.[1][2]

Demographic characteristics[edit]

As of the 2010 United States Census the district had a population of 215,703, of whom 161,998 (75.1%) were of voting age. The racial makeup of the district was 197,640 (91.6%) White, 4,826 (2.2%) African American, 324 (0.2%) Native American, 6,155 (2.9%) Asian, 51 (0.0%) Pacific Islander, 3,077 (1.4%) from some other race, and 3,630 (1.7%) from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 15,059 (7.0%) of the population.[3] The 24th District had 151,744 registered voters as of December 31, 2016, of whom 61,417 (40.5%) were registered as unaffiliated, 60,188 (39.7%) were registered as Republicans, 29,609 (19.5%) were registered as Democrats, and 530 (0.3%) were registered to other parties.[4]

As of 2000, the district had the fourth-smallest population of any in the state and the third highest land area, making it one of the least densely populated districts in the state. The district has an extremely small minority population, with comparatively few African American (at 1.3%, the state's second lowest), Asian and Hispanic residents, and has the smallest percentage of residents age 65 and over (8.9%). Registered Republicans outnumber Democrats by a better than 3-1 margin and the district has the highest percentage of registered Republicans and the lowest percentage of Democrats.[5][6]

Apportionment history[edit]

Upon the creation of the 40-district legislative map in 1973, the 24th District from this point until 1981 was a narrow district running from New Providence and Summit in Union County, through eastern Morris County, into north-central Passaic County including Pompton Lakes, Bloomingdale, and Wanaque.[7] After the 1981 redistricting, the district shape took on boundaries similar to its present limits. It included all of Sussex County except Stanhope, and all of Warren County except Franklin Township, Greenwich Township, and the Borough and Township of Washington.[8] In the 1990s, the 24th consisted of all of Sussex County, western Morris County, and northern Hunterdon County (all municipalities in Warren County were removed).[9] Hunterdon County's Lebanon Township, Hampton borough, Glen Gardner, and High Bridge were shifted to the 23rd District in the 2001 redistricting leaving only Califon and Tewksbury Township as Hunterdon County's portion of the 24th District; no other changes were made in this redistricting.[10]

Changes made as part of the New Jersey Legislative apportionment in 2011 added Allamuchy Township, Belvidere Town, Blairstown Township, Frelinghuysen Township, Hardwick Township, Hope Township, Independence Township, Knowlton Township, Liberty Township, Oxford Township and White Township (all from District 23). Removed were Califon and Tewksbury Township (to District 23); and Chester Borough, Chester Township, Netcong Borough and Washington Township (Morris) (all to District 25).[11]

Political representation[edit]

The district is represented for the 2016–2017 Legislative Session (Senate, General Assembly) in the State Senate by Steve Oroho (R, Franklin) and in the General Assembly by Parker Space (R, Wantage Township) and Gail Phoebus (R, Andover Township).[12][13]

Election history[edit]

When the 1981 redistricting occurred following the results of the 1980 United States Census, State Senator James P. Vreeland and Assembly members Dean Gallo and Leanna Brown were shifted to the 26th Legislative District, with all three winning re-election in their new district.[14]

In the face of difficulties recovering from a stroke he had suffered in October 1988, Wayne Dumont had been in deteriorating health and stepped down from the Senate in July 1990.[15] Assemblyman Robert Littell was chosen by a special convention of Republican committee members from Sussex and Warren Counties to fill Dumont's vacancy in the Senate.[16] In turn, Scott Garrett was chosen to fill Littell's vacant seat in the Assembly.[17]

Robert Littell chose not to run for re-election in 2007 and by the time he had left office in 2008 had become the longest-serving legislator in New Jersey history, having served a total of 40 years in office. When his daughter Alison Littell McHose took office in the Assembly in 2004, they became the legislature's first father-daughter combination to serve simultaneously in the legislature.[18]

Parker Space took office in March 2013, filling the seat vacated by Gary R. Chiusano, who had been chosen to fill a vacancy as Sussex County Surrogate.[19] On October 17, 2015, Littell McHose resigned her seat to work full-time at her position as Franklin Borough's administrator.[20] Sussex County Freeholder Gail Phoebus who had been chosen in the June 2015 primary election to run and was elected in the November general election was appointed to the seat and sworn in late in the legislative term on December 3.[21]

Senators and Assembly members elected from the district are as follows:[22]

Session Senate Assembly
1974–1975 James P. Vreeland (R) Barbara A. Curran (R) John J. Sinsimer (D)
1976–1977 Barbara A. Curran (R) Dean Gallo (R)
1978–1979 James P. Vreeland (R) Barbara A. Curran (R) Dean Gallo (R)
1980–1981 Barbara A. Curran (R)[n 1] Dean Gallo (R)
Leanna Brown (R)[n 2]
1982–1983 Wayne Dumont (R) Chuck Haytaian (R) Robert Littell (R)
1984–1985 Wayne Dumont (R) Chuck Haytaian (R) Robert Littell (R)
1986–1987 Chuck Haytaian (R) Robert Littell (R)
1988–1989 Wayne Dumont (R)[n 3] Chuck Haytaian (R) Robert Littell (R)
1990–1991[23] Chuck Haytaian (R) Robert Littell (R)[n 4]
Robert Littell (R)[n 4] Scott Garrett (R)[n 5]
1992–1993 Robert Littell (R) C. Richard Kamin (R) Scott Garrett (R)
1994–1995[24] Robert Littell (R) C. Richard Kamin (R)[n 6] Scott Garrett (R)
Guy R. Gregg (R)[n 7]
1996–1997 Guy R. Gregg (R) Scott Garrett (R)
1998–1999[25] Robert Littell (R) Guy R. Gregg (R) Scott Garrett (R)
2000–2001[26] Guy R. Gregg (R) Scott Garrett (R)
2002–2003[27] Robert Littell (R) Guy R. Gregg (R) Scott Garrett (R)[n 8]
Alison Littell McHose (R)[n 9]
2004–2005[28] Robert Littell (R) Guy R. Gregg (R) Alison Littell McHose (R)
2006–2007 Guy R. Gregg (R) Alison Littell McHose (R)
2008–2009 Steve Oroho (R) Gary R. Chiusano (R) Alison Littell McHose (R)
2010–2011[29] Gary R. Chiusano (R) Alison Littell McHose (R)
2012–2013 Steve Oroho (R) Gary R. Chiusano (R)[n 10] Alison Littell McHose (R)
Parker Space (R)[n 11]
2014-2015[30] Steve Oroho (R) Parker Space (R) Alison Littell McHose (R)[n 12]
Gail Phoebus (R)[n 13]
2016–2017 Parker Space (R) Gail Phoebus (R)
  1. ^ Resigned June 23, 1980 to become a commissioner on the Board of Public Utilities
  2. ^ Elected to the Assembly in November 1980 special election, sworn in on November 24, 1980
  3. ^ Resigned July 1, 1990 for health reasons
  4. ^ a b Appointed to the Senate on September 24, 1990, won a November 1990 special election to complete the unexpired term
  5. ^ Appointed to the Assembly on November 19, 1990
  6. ^ Resigned April 25, 1994 to become director of the Motor Vehicle Commission
  7. ^ Appointed to the Assembly on June 16, 1994, elected in November 1994 special election to complete the unexpired term
  8. ^ Resigned January 3, 2003 upon his election to Congress
  9. ^ Appointed to the Assembly on February 4, 2003
  10. ^ Resigned February 11, 2013 to become Sussex County Surrogate
  11. ^ Appointed to the Assembly on February 23, 2013[19]
  12. ^ Resigned October 17, 2015
  13. ^ Appointed to the Assembly on December 3, 2015

Election results[edit]

Senate[edit]

New Jersey general election, 1973[31]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican James P. Vreeland, Jr. 26,004 52.6
Democratic John C. Keefe 23,417 47.4
Total votes 49,421 100.0
New Jersey general election, 1977[32]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican James P. Vreeland 34,694 67.1
Democratic Norma K. Herzfeld 17,036 32.9
Total votes 51,730 100.0
New Jersey general election, 1981[14]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Wayne Dumont, Jr. 37,467 77.4
Democratic Edward Gaffney 10,953 22.6
Total votes 48,420 100.0
New Jersey general election, 1983[33]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Wayne Dumont, Jr. 29,279 75.6
Democratic Clarence W. Sickles 9,431 24.4
Total votes 38,710 100.0
New Jersey general election, 1987[34]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Wayne Dumont, Jr. 34,617 100.0
Total votes 34,617 100.0
Special election, 1990[35]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Robert E. Littell 28,480 54.6
The People's Candidate George T. Daggett 13,734 26.3
Democratic Clarence W. Sickles 9,963 19.1
Total votes 52,177 100.0
New Jersey general election, 1991[36]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Robert E. Littell 31,432 74.8
Democratic Frederick J. Katz, Jr. 7,216 17.2
Middle Class Alternative Gary “Buzz” Howell 3,363 8.0
Total votes 42,011 100.0
New Jersey general election, 1993[37]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Robert E. Littell 47,382 83.3
Libertarian William J. Dundas 9,502 16.7
Total votes 56,884 100.0
New Jersey general election, 1997[38][39]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Robert E. Littell 44,342 73.0
Democratic John G. Wingler 13,551 22.3
Conservative Ron Pondiscio 2,868 4.7
Total votes 60,761 100.0
New Jersey general election, 2001[40]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Robert E. Littell 41,019 74.4
Democratic Edwin Selby 14,117 25.6
Total votes 55,136 100.0
New Jersey general election, 2003[41]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Robert E. Littell 23,106 68.1
Democratic James D. Morrison 10,810 31.9
Total votes 33,916 100.0
New Jersey general election, 2007[42]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Steven V. Oroho 31,143 69.5
Democratic Edwin C. Selby 13,694 30.5
Total votes 44,837 100.0
New Jersey general election, 2011[43]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Steven V. Oroho 21,044 66.0
Democratic Edwin Selby 10,837 34.0
Total votes 31,881 100.0
New Jersey general election, 2013[44]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Steven V. Oroho 38,819 70.4
Democratic Richard D. Tomko 16,292 29.6
Total votes 55,111 100.0

Assembly[edit]

New Jersey general election, 1973[31]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic John J. Sinsimer 24,917 25.3
Republican Barbara A. Curran 24,847 25.2
Democratic Charles M. Kennedy, Jr. 24,644 25.0
Republican Ralph J. Ferrara 24,245 24.6
Total votes 98,653 100.0
New Jersey general election, 1975[45]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Barbara A. Curran 28,343 29.3
Republican Dean A. Gallo 26,277 27.2
Democratic John J. Sinsimer 19,672 20.4
Democratic Paul N. Bontempo 19,383 20.1
No Income Tax Dale E. Webb 2,926 3.0
Total votes 96,601 100.0
New Jersey general election, 1977[32]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Barbara A. Curran 34,696 34.1
Republican Dean A. Gallo 33,306 32.7
Democratic John J. Sinsimer, Jr. 17,801 17.5
Democratic Robert C. Kadri 15,960 15.7
Total votes 101,763 100.0
New Jersey general election, 1979[46]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Dean A. Gallo 24,129 34.5
Republican Barbara A. Curran 24,048 34.4
Democratic Clayton D. Brown 11,423 16.4
Democratic Kevin E. Renahan 10,244 14.7
Total votes 69,844 100.0
Special election, 1980[47]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Leanna Brown 46,838 71.3
Democratic Laurence J. Cutler 18,842 28.7
Total votes 65,680 100.0
New Jersey general election, 1981[14]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Robert E. Littell 30,515 35.4
Republican Garabed “Chuck” Haytaian 28,293 32.8
Democratic Joseph T. Daly 14,779 17.1
Democratic David B. Bogert 12,673 14.7
Total votes 86,260 100.0
New Jersey general election, 1983[33]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Robert E. Littell 26,160 36.0
Republican Garabed “Chuck” Haytaian 25,217 34.7
Democratic Robert T. Davis 11,041 15.2
Democratic Daniel A. Barton 10,152 14.0
Total votes 72,570 100.0
New Jersey general election, 1985[48]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Robert E. Littell 30,616 37.3
Republican Garabed “Chuck” Haytaian 29,094 35.4
Democratic Robert T. Davis 12,806 15.6
Democratic John P. Kilroy, Jr. 9,617 11.7
Total votes 82,133 100.0
New Jersey general election, 1987[34]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Garabed “Chuck” Haytaian 26,586 35.8
Republican Robert E. Littell 25,942 34.9
Democratic Robert T. Davis 11,154 15.0
Democratic Edwin C. Selby 10,545 14.2
Total votes 74,227 100.0
New Jersey general election, 1989[49]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Robert E. Littell 35,117 33.4
Republican Garabed “Chuck” Haytaian 34,579 32.9
Democratic Timothy P. McCabe 15,301 14.5
Democratic Robert T. Davis 13,585 12.9
Reduce Insurance Rates Frederick P. Cook 6,660 6.3
Total votes 105,242 100.0
New Jersey general election, 1991[36]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican E. Scott Garrett 31,174 39.6
Republican Dick Kamin 30,944 39.3
Democratic Michael J. Larose 13,106 16.7
Populist ('84-'96) Stuart Bacha 1,957 2.5
Populist ('84-'96) Compton C. Pakenham 1,523 1.9
Total votes 78,704 100.0
New Jersey general election, 1993[37]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican E. Scott Garrett 46,673 43.4
Republican Dick Kamin 45,491 42.3
Democratic William Weightman 15,310 14.2
Total votes 107,474 100.0
Special election, November 8, 1994[50]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Guy R. Gregg 34,632 66.0
Democratic Cooper H. Morris 17,816 34.0
Total votes 52,448 100.0
New Jersey general election, 1995[51]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican E. Scott Garrett 21,721 36.6
Republican Guy R. Gregg 21,154 35.7
Democratic Edwin C. Selby 9,290 15.7
Independent Bernadine Silver 4,364 7.4
Independent Ronald C. Pondiscio 2,803 4.7
Total votes 59,332 100.0
New Jersey general election, 1997[52][25]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican E. Scott Garrett 43,066 39.7
Republican Guy R. Gregg 40,170 37.1
Democratic Frederick J. Katz, Jr. 14,878 13.7
Conservative Marilyn McCann 4,015 3.7
Libertarian Jeffrey Polachek 3,654 3.4
Conservative Ed De Mott 2,622 2.4
Total votes 108,405 100.0
New Jersey general election, 1999[53]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican E. Scott Garrett 22,444 42.3
Republican Guy R. Gregg 21,479 40.5
Democratic Edwin C. Selby 9,119 17.2
Total votes 53,042 100.0
New Jersey general election, 2001[54]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Scott Garrett 38,242 36.3
Republican Guy R. Gregg 36,121 34.2
Democratic Suzanne Patnaude 15,754 14.9
Democratic Margarita Cart 15,369 14.6
Total votes 105,486 100.0
New Jersey general election, 2003[55]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Guy R. Gregg 24,472 41.3
Republican Alison Littell McHose 23,103 39.0
Democratic Thomas B. Boyle 11,658 19.7
Total votes 59,233 100.0
New Jersey general election, 2005[56]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Alison Littell McHose 37,318 33.6
Republican Guy R. Gregg 36,615 33.0
Democratic Brian S. Murphy 18,643 16.8
Democratic Thomas B. Boyle 18,328 16.5
Total votes 110,904 100.0
New Jersey general election, 2007[57]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Alison Littell McHose 30,453 34.8
Republican Gary R. Chiusano 29,616 33.8
Democratic Pat Walsh 13,845 15.8
Democratic Toni Zimmer 13,644 15.6
Total votes 87,558 100.0
New Jersey general election, 2009[58]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Alison Littell McHose 50,973 43.8
Republican Gary R. Chiusano 47,741 41.0
Democratic Frederick J. Katz, Jr. 17,781 15.3
Total votes 116,495 100.0
New Jersey general election, 2011[59]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Alison Littell McHose 19,026 30.6
Republican Gary R. Chiusano 18,561 29.8
Democratic Leslie Huhn 10,290 16.5
Democratic Jim Nye 9,832 15.8
Tea Party Proud Rose Ann Salanitri 3,161 5.1
Principle Not Party Mark D. Quick 1,382 2.2
Total votes 62,252 100.0
New Jersey general election, 2013[30]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Alison Littell McHose 37,399 36.0
Republican F. Parker Space 35,093 33.8
Democratic Susan M. Williams 16,883 16.3
Democratic William (Bill) Weightman 14,411 13.9
Total votes 103,786 100.0
New Jersey general election, 2015[60]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican F. Parker Space 18,058 35.0
Republican Gail Phoebus 17,217 33.3
Democratic Jacqueline Stapel 7,165 13.9
Democratic Michael F. Grace 6,998 13.5
Green Kenneth Collins 2,227 4.3
Total votes 51,665 100.0

References[edit]

  1. ^ Districts by Number, New Jersey Legislature. Accessed February 11, 2014.
  2. ^ Municipalities (sorted by 2011 legislative district), New Jersey Department of State. Accessed February 11, 2014.
  3. ^ DP-1: Profile of General Population and Housing Characteristics: 2010 - 2010 Demographic Profile Data for General Assembly District 23 (2010), New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed February 11, 2014.
  4. ^ Statewide Voter Registration Summary, New Jersey Department of State, December 31, 2016. Accessed January 13, 2017.
  5. ^ District 24 Profile, Rutgers University. Accessed August 4, 2010.
  6. ^ 2005 New Jersey Legislative District Data Book. Edward J. Bloustein School of Planning and Public Policy. p. 107. 
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  13. ^ District 24 Legislators, New Jersey Legislature. Accessed January 16, 2016.
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  19. ^ a b Miller, Jennifer Jean. "George Graham Chosen as Freeholder at Sussex County Republican Convention", TheAlternativePress.com, April 13, 2013. Accessed February 11, 2014. "Graham will fill the freeholder seat that New Jersey Assemblyman Parker Space left to take his new position. Space recently took the seat, which formerly belonged to Gary Chiusano, who in turn, was appointed to the spot of Sussex County Surrogate, following the retirement of Surrogate Nancy Fitzgibbons."
  20. ^ Jennings, Rob (October 16, 2015). "McHose resigns from Assembly". New Jersey Herald. Retrieved November 1, 2015. 
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