24th Tactical Air Support Squadron

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24th Tactical Air Support Squadron
Active 1939-1942; 1942-1946; 1947-1949: 1951-1953; 1956-1960; 1969-1975; 1976-1991
Country  United States
Branch  United States Air Force
Role Control of Tactical Air
Part of USAF Southern Command
Engagements China Burma India Theater

History[edit]

The first predecessor of the 24th Tactical Air Support Squadron was the 24th Bombardment Squadron (Light) which was activated in late 1939 as a test unit for light bombardment aircraft at Maxwell Field, Alabama. The squadron was disbanded in the spring of 1942 in a reorganization of United States Army Air Forces operational testing units in the spring of 1942.[1]

The second predecessor of the squadron was activated in the fall of 1942 as the 24th Photographic Mapping Squadron. After training in the United States under Second Air Force, the squadron deployed to the China Burma India Theater, where it performed combat mapping. mostly with North American B-25 Mitchells and Consolidated B-24 Liberators equipped with vertical and oblique Mapping cameras until moving to Clark Field in the Philippines, where it was inactivated in 1946. In Asia, the squadron deployed detachments to a number of locations, although the headquarters remained in Guskhara Airfield, India.[2]

The squadron was activated again in the reserves in 1947 as the 24th Reconnaissance Squadron, but apparently was not equipped before inactivating when Continental Air Command reorganized under the Wing Base Organization plan in 1949. The squadron was activated in the regular Air Force in 1951 as the 24th Strategic Reconnaissance Squadron at Lake Charles AFB, Louisiana and equipped with Boeing RB-29s. When its parent 68th Strategic Reconnaissance Wing converted to a bombardment mission in 1942, the squadron became the 24th Bombardment Squadron, but was inactivated in 1953.[2]

The 24th Helicopter Squadron was activated in 1956 at Sewart Air Force Base, Tennessee. After several months of training the squadron moved to Tachikawa Air Base, Japan, where it served until 1960. The transfer was made on an aircraft carrier of the United States Navy.[3] The unit's mission was to maintain helicopter logistics airlift capability, to perform air land supply operations, scheduled and special airlift operations, and conduct training.[4] Detachment 2 of the squadron was attached to the 41st Air Division to provide logistial support to the division's remote radar sites.[5] In 1958 and 1959 the squadron returned to Burma when it participated in Operation South Bound, which provided assistance to the Burmese Air Force in combatting local insurrectionists.[6][7]

The squadron was redesignated the 24th Special Operations Squadron and activated in Panama in 1969. In 1985, the squadron was consolidated with its two predecessor units. The consolidated squadron became the 24th Tactical Air Support Squadron in 1987, and was inactivated in the spring of 1991.

Lineage[edit]

24th Bombardment Squadron (Light)

  • Constituted as the 24th Attack-Bombardment Squadron on 1 August 1939
Redesignated 24th Bombardment Squadron (Light) on 28 September 1939
Activated on 1 December 1939
  • Disbanded on 1 May 1942
  • Reconstituted on 19 September 1985 and consolidated with 24th Bombardment Squadron, Medium and 24th Composite Squadron as 24th Composite Squadron[8]

24th Bombardment Squadron, Medium

  • Constituted as 24th Photographic Mapping Squadron on 14 July 1942
Activated on 2 September 1942
Redesignated as 24th Photographic Squadron (Heavy) on 6 February 1943
Redesignated as 24th Combat Mapping Squadron on 11 August 1943
Inactivated on 15 June 1946
  • Redesignated 24th Reconnaissance Squadron, Very Long Range (Photographic - RCM) on 13 May 1947 and allotted to the reserve
Activated on 12 July 1947
Inactivated on 27 June 1949
  • Redesignated 24th Strategic Reconnaissance Squadron, Medium (Photographic)
Activated on 10 October 1951
Redesignated 24th Bombardment Squadron, Medium on 16 June 1952
Redesignated 24th Strategic Reconnaissance Squadron, Medium and inactivated on 16 January 1953[2]
Redesignated 24th Bombardment Squadron, Medium (remained inactive)
  • Consolidated on 19 September 1985 with 24th Bombardment Squadron, (Light) and 24th Composite Squadron as 24th Composite Squadron[8]

24th Tactical Air Support Squadron

  • Constituted as the 24th Helicopter Squadron on 24 February 1956
Activated on 9 July 1956
Inactivated on 8 March 1960
  • Redesignated 24th Special Operations Squadron in 1969
Activated on 18 March 1969
Redesignated 24th Composite Squadron on 15 November 1973
Inactivated on 1 July 1975
Activated on 1 January 1976
  • Consolidated with 24th Bombardment Squadron, Medium and 24th Bombardment Squadron, Medium on 19 September 1985[8]
Redesignated 24th Tactical Air Support Squadron on 1 January 1987
Inactivated on 31 March 1991

Assignments[edit]

Stations[edit]

Detachment Locations during World War II[edit]

  • Hsinching Airfield, China, 17 March 1944 – 9 April 1944, 27 April 1944 − c. 1 July 1944, October–November 1944
  • Jorhat Airfield, India, 9 April 1944 – 22 April 1944
  • Liuchow Airfield, China, 10 July 1944 – 22 September 1944
  • Chanyi Airfield, China, 22 September 1944 – 17 February 1945
  • Pengshan Airfield, China, November 1944
  • Tulihal and Cox’s Bazar, India, February 1945 − c. April 1945

Aircraft[edit]

Awards and Campaigns[edit]

Award streamer Award Dates Notes
Air Force Outstanding Unit Award Streamer.jpg Air Force Outstanding Unit Award 1 January 1957 - 1 August 1958 24th Helicopter Squadron[10]
Air Force Outstanding Unit Award Streamer.jpg Air Force Outstanding Unit Award 18 March 1969 - 13 April 1970 24th Special Operations Squadron[11]
Air Force Outstanding Unit Award Streamer.jpg Air Force Outstanding Unit Award 16 March 1971 - 15 March 1973 24th Special Operations Squadron[11]
Campaign Streamer Campaign Dates Notes
Streamer APC.PNG China Defensive 24th Combat Mapping Squadron[2]
Streamer APC.PNG Central Burma 24th Combat Mapping Squadron[2]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ a b c Maurer, Maurer, ed. (1982) [1969]. Combat Squadrons of the Air Force, World War II (PDF) (reprint ed.). Washington, DC: Office of Air Force History. p. 125. ISBN 0-405-12194-6. LCCN 70605402. OCLC 72556. 
  2. ^ a b c d e Maurer, Combat Squadrons, pp. 126-127
  3. ^ Abstract, History 314th Troop Carrier Wing Jul-Dec 1956 (retrieved 10 July 2013)
  4. ^ Abstract, History 24th Helicopter Sq Jan-Jun 1958 (retrieved 10 July 2013)
  5. ^ a b Abstract, History 41st Air Div Jul-Dec 1956 (retrieved 10 July 2013)
  6. ^ Abstract, History 24th Helicopter Sq July-Dec 1958 (retrieved 10 July 2013)
  7. ^ Abstract, History 24th Helicopter Sq Jan-Jun 1959 (retrieved 10 July 2013)
  8. ^ a b c Department of the Air Force/MPM Letter 662q, 19 Sep 85, Subject: Reconstitution, Redesignation, and Consolidation of Selected Air Force Tactical Squadrons
  9. ^ "Factsheet 315 Air Division". Air Force Historical Research Agency. Archived from the original on 30 October 2012. Retrieved 24 February 2014. 
  10. ^ AF Pamphlet 900-2, Unit Decorations, Awards and Campaign Participation Credits Department of the Air Force, Washington, DC, 15 Jun 1971, p. 144
  11. ^ a b AF Pamphlet 900-2, Unit Decorations, Awards and Campaign Participation Credits, Vol II Department of the Air Force, Washington, DC, 30 Sep 1976 , p. 21

Bibliography[edit]

 This article incorporates public domain material from websites or documents of the Air Force Historical Research Agency.

External links[edit]