254 Augusta

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254 Augusta
Discovery [1]
Discovered by J. Palisa
Discovery site Vienna Obs.
Discovery date 31 March 1886
Designations
MPC designation 254 Augusta
Named after
Auguste von Littrow[2]
Augusta · main-belt
Orbital characteristics[1]
Epoch 31 July 2016 (JD 2457600.5)
Uncertainty parameter 0
Observation arc 130.04 yr (47498 d)
Aphelion 2.4613 AU (368.21 Gm)
Perihelion 1.9281 AU (288.44 Gm)
2.1947 AU (328.32 Gm)
Eccentricity 0.12147
3.25 yr (1187.5 d)
20.1 km/s[citation needed]
340.92°
0° 18m 11.34s / day
Inclination 4.5131°
28.473°
233.14°
Earth MOID 0.916708 AU (137.1376 Gm)
Jupiter MOID 2.58938 AU (387.366 Gm)
Jupiter Tisserand parameter 3.656
Physical characteristics
Dimensions 12.11±1.1 km
5.8949 h (0.24562 d)
0.1695±0.036
B–V = 0.845
U–B = 0.505
Tholen = S
12.13

254 Augusta is a main-belt asteroid, discovered on March 31, 1886 by astronomer Johann Palisa at Vienna Observatory, Austria. The stony S-type asteroid measures about 12 kilometers in diameter.[1]

It is the first-numbered member of the Augusta family, after which the small Asteroid family and subgroup of the main-belt has been named.

Augusta was named after the German–Austrian writer Auguste von Littrow (1819–1890), widow of astronomer Carl Ludwig von Littrow, who was a former director of the Vienna Observatory.[2]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c "JPL Small-Body Database Browser: 254 Augusta" (2015-03-28 last obs.). Jet Propulsion Laboratory. Retrieved 12 May 2016. 
  2. ^ a b Schmadel, Lutz D. (2003). Dictionary of Minor Planet Names – (254) Augusta. Springer Berlin Heidelberg. p. 37. ISBN 978-3-540-29925-7. Retrieved October 2015.  Check date values in: |access-date= (help)

External links[edit]