2591 Dworetsky

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2591 Dworetsky
Discovery [1]
Discovered by K. Reinmuth
Discovery site Heidelberg Obs.
Discovery date 2 August 1949
Designations
MPC designation 2591 Dworetsky
Named after
Michael Dworetsky
(British astronomer)[2]
1949 PS · 1929 RH1
1934 RD · 1949 QU
1952 DC1 · 1962 BD
1962 EH · 1969 OC
1973 GQ · 1975 TU4
1978 GX3 · 1979 OD14
1981 YL2 · 1982 BO
main-belt · (outer)[3]
Orbital characteristics[1]
Epoch 16 February 2017 (JD 2457800.5)
Uncertainty parameter 0
Observation arc 81.45 yr (29,748 days)
Aphelion 3.0612 AU
Perihelion 2.8140 AU
2.9376 AU
Eccentricity 0.0421
5.03 yr (1,839 days)
197.70°
0° 11m 44.88s / day
Inclination 1.5430°
356.26°
273.59°
Physical characteristics
Dimensions 12.925±0.141[4]
13.269±0.195 km[5]
15.60 km (calculated)[3]
12.77±0.05 h[6]
0.20 (assumed)[3]
0.2792±0.0310[5]
0.291±0.037[4]
S[3][7]
11.4[5] · 11.5[1][3] · 11.70±0.46[7]

2591 Dworetsky, provisional designation 1949 PS, is a stony asteroid from the outer region of the asteroid belt, approximately 13 kilometers in diameter. It was discovered on 2 August 1949, by German astronomer Karl Reinmuth at the Heidelberg Observatory in southern Germany.[8]

The S-type asteroid orbits the Sun at a distance of 2.8–3.1 AU once every 5.03 years (1,839 days). Its orbit has an eccentricity of 0.04 and an inclination of 2° with respect to the ecliptic.[1] It has a rotation period of 12.8 hours[6] and an albedo of 0.279 and 0.291, based on observations made by NASA's Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer and its subsequent NEOWISE mission.[4][5] The Collaborative Asteroid Lightcurve Link assumes a standard albedo for stony asteroids of 0.20, and calculates a diameter of 15.6 kilometers, based on an absolute magnitude of 11.5.[3]

The minor planet was named in honor of British astronomer Michael Dworetsky, senior lecturer at University College London (UCL). He is an active member of the International Astronomical Union, affiliated to several divisions, including "Education, Outreach and Heritage".[9] His research involve the stellar abundances of the mercury group of elements and has also taken a large part in the development of the undergraduate astronomy degree program. The asteroid's name was proposed by Conrad Bardwell (also see 1615 Bardwell), who made the identifications involving this minor planet.[2] Naming citation was published on 27 June 1991 (M.P.C. 18448).[10]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d "JPL Small-Body Database Browser: 2591 Dworetsky (1949 PS)" (2016-02-15 last obs.). Jet Propulsion Laboratory. Retrieved 6 December 2016. 
  2. ^ a b Schmadel, Lutz D. (2007). Dictionary of Minor Planet Names – (2591) Dworetsky. Springer Berlin Heidelberg. p. 211. ISBN 978-3-540-00238-3. Retrieved 6 December 2016. 
  3. ^ a b c d e f "LCDB Data for (2591) Dworetsky". Asteroid Lightcurve Database (LCDB). Retrieved 6 December 2016. 
  4. ^ a b c Masiero, Joseph R.; Mainzer, A. K.; Grav, T.; Bauer, J. M.; Cutri, R. M.; Dailey, J.; et al. (November 2011). "Main Belt Asteroids with WISE/NEOWISE. I. Preliminary Albedos and Diameters". The Astrophysical Journal. 741 (2): 20. arXiv:1109.4096Freely accessible. Bibcode:2011ApJ...741...68M. doi:10.1088/0004-637X/741/2/68. Retrieved 6 December 2016. 
  5. ^ a b c d Mainzer, A.; Grav, T.; Masiero, J.; Hand, E.; Bauer, J.; Tholen, D.; et al. (November 2011). "NEOWISE Studies of Spectrophotometrically Classified Asteroids: Preliminary Results" (PDF). The Astrophysical Journal. 741 (2): 25. arXiv:1109.6407Freely accessible. Bibcode:2011ApJ...741...90M. doi:10.1088/0004-637X/741/2/90. Retrieved 6 December 2016. 
  6. ^ a b Behrend, Raoul. "Asteroids and comets rotation curves – (2591) Dworetsky". Geneva Observatory. Retrieved 6 December 2016. 
  7. ^ a b Veres, Peter; Jedicke, Robert; Fitzsimmons, Alan; Denneau, Larry; Granvik, Mikael; Bolin, Bryce; et al. (November 2015). "Absolute magnitudes and slope parameters for 250,000 asteroids observed by Pan-STARRS PS1 - Preliminary results". Icarus. 261: 34–47. arXiv:1506.00762Freely accessible. Bibcode:2015Icar..261...34V. doi:10.1016/j.icarus.2015.08.007. Retrieved 6 December 2016. 
  8. ^ "2591 Dworetsky (1949 PS)". Minor Planet Center. Retrieved 6 December 2016. 
  9. ^ "Michael M. Dworetsky". International Astronomical Union (IAU). Retrieved 10 December 2015. 
  10. ^ "MPC/MPO/MPS Archive". Minor Planet Center. Retrieved 6 December 2016. 

External links[edit]