25th Legislative District (New Jersey)

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New Jersey's 25th Legislative District
New Jersey Legislative Districts Map (2011) D25 hl.svg
Senator Anthony Bucco (R)
Assembly members Michael Patrick Carroll (R)
Tony Bucco (R)
Registration
Demographics
Population 215,844
Voting-age population 157,481
Registered voters 153,349

New Jersey's 25th Legislative District is one of 40 in the New Jersey Legislature. As of the 2011 apportionment, the district includes the Morris County municipalities of Boonton Town, Boonton Township, Chester Borough, Chester Township, Denville Township, Dover Town, Mendham Borough, Mendham Township, Mine Hill Township, Morris Township, Morristown Town, Mount Arlington Borough, Mountain Lakes Borough, Netcong Borough, Randolph Township, Rockaway Borough, Roxbury Township, Victory Gardens Borough, Washington Township and Wharton Borough; and the Somerset County municipality of Bernardsville Borough.[1][2]

Demographic characteristics[edit]

As of the 2010 United States Census, the district had a population of 215,844, of whom 164,606 (76.3%) were of voting age. The racial makeup of the district was 177,870 (82.4%) White, 8,957 (4.1%) African American, 462 (0.2%) Native American, 12,900 (6.0%) Asian, 64 (0.0%) Pacific Islander, 10,457 (4.8%) from some other race, and 5,134 (2.4%) from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 37,454 (17.4%) of the population.[3] The 25th District had 153,349 registered voters as of December 31, 2016, of whom 60,509 (39.5%) were registered as unaffiliated, 52,414 (34.2%) were registered as Republicans, 39,962 (26.1%) were registered as Democrats, and 464 (0.3%) were registered to other parties.[4]

The district had high levels of income on average, but the communities of Dover, Mine Hill, Victory Gardens are well below the state average. The district had a high percentage of Hispanic residents, with Dover having some 60% of its residents as being of Hispanic origin. Registered Republicans outnumber Democrats by a nearly 2–1 margin.[5][6]

Apportionment history[edit]

The first iteration of District 25 came in 1973 upon the creation of the statewide 40-district legislative map. The 25th at that time traveled from Maplewood along the western border of Essex County to Fairfield Township (also including North Caldwell, Passaic County's Wayne Township, and Lincoln Park and Pequannock Township in Morris County.[7] In the next redistricting in 1981, the district became based through the center of Morris County running from Harding Township through Morristown, Dover, Boonton, and Jefferson Township.[8] The shape of the district remained mostly the same in the 1991 redistricting picking up Mendham Township, Mount Arlington, and Roxbury Township, but losing Madison and Mountain Lakes.[9]

Changes to the district made as part of the New Jersey Legislative apportionment in 2001, based on the results of the 2000 United States Census added Mountain Lakes Borough (from the 26th Legislative District) and removed Hanover Township (to the 26th Legislative District) and Harding Township (to the 21st Legislative District).[10]

As a consequence of the New Jersey Legislative apportionment in 2011, Jefferson Township and Rockaway Township were moved to District 26. The 25th District was shifted south and west, adding Morris County GOP strongholds Mendham Borough (from District 16), Chester Borough, Chester Township and Washington Township (from District 24); and Bernardsville in Somerset County (from District 16).

Political representation[edit]

The district is represented for the 2016–2017 Legislative Session (Senate, General Assembly) in the State Senate by Anthony Bucco (R, Boonton) and in the General Assembly by Michael Patrick Carroll (R, Morris Township) and Tony Bucco (R, Boonton Township).[11][12]

Election history[edit]

William E. Bishop was elected in a special election held on April 20, 1982, to fill the vacancy left by James J. Barry, Jr., who had been named as Director of the New Jersey Division of Consumer Affairs by Governor of New Jersey Thomas Kean.[13] Bishop was defeated by Morris County Freeholder Rodney Frelinghuysen and incumbent Arthur R. Albohn in the 1983 Republican primary for the full term.[14][15]

In the 1993 general election, former Assemblymember Gordon MacInnes defeated Republican incumbent John H. Dorsey by nearly 300 votes, making him the first Democrat in 18 years to win a legislative seat in Morris County.[16]

After Frelinghuysen took office in the United States House of Representatives in January 1995, Anthony Bucco was chosen by Morris County Republican county committee members to fill Frelinghuysen's vacant seat in the Assembly.[17] Bucco and Michael Patrick Carroll won the six-way June 1995 Republican primary to fill the district's two Assembly ballot spots, which became open when Albohn decided against running for re-election for a ninth term of office.[18] In this primary, the two winners defeated then Morris County Freeholder Chris Christie and future Assemblyman Rick Merkt.[19]

In 1997, Anthony Bucco left the Assembly to successfully contest the Democratic-held Senate seat, with Merkt taking the Assembly seat vacated by Bucco.[20]

With Merkt running for the Republican nomination for governor in 2009, the 25th District saw a contested Republican primary with incumbent Michael Patrick Carroll facing Tony Bucco and the younger Bucco's brother-in-law Douglas Cabana, a member of the Morris County Board of Chosen Freeholders. Bucco and Carroll won the two ballot spots and were elected in the general election.[21]

In 2011, Michael Patrick Carroll and Tony Bucco retained their seats in the Assembly, defeating Democratic challengers Gale Heiss-Colucci and George Stafford, while Anthony Bucco retained his Senate seat over challenger Rick Thoeni.[22]

Session Senate Assembly
1974–1975 James Wallwork (R) Jane Burgio (R) Thomas Kean (R)
1976–1977 Jane Burgio (R) Thomas Kean (R)
1978–1979 James Wallwork (R) Jane Burgio (R) Frederic Remington (R)
1980–1981 Jane Burgio (R) Frederic Remington (R)
1982–1983 John H. Dorsey (R) Arthur R. Albohn (R) James J. Barry Jr. (R)[n 1]
William E. Bishop (R)[n 2]
1984–1985 John H. Dorsey (R) Arthur R. Albohn (R) Rodney Frelinghuysen (R)
1986–1987 Arthur R. Albohn (R) Rodney Frelinghuysen (R)
1988–1989 John H. Dorsey (R) Arthur R. Albohn (R) Rodney Frelinghuysen (R)
1990–1991[23] Arthur R. Albohn (R) Rodney Frelinghuysen (R)
1992–1993 John H. Dorsey (R) Arthur R. Albohn (R) Rodney Frelinghuysen (R)
1994–1995[24] Gordon MacInnes (D) Arthur R. Albohn (R) Rodney Frelinghuysen (R)[n 3]
Anthony Bucco (R)[n 4]
1996–1997 Michael Patrick Carroll (R) Anthony Bucco (R)
1998–1999[25] Anthony Bucco (R) Michael Patrick Carroll (R) Rick Merkt (R)
2000–2001[26] Michael Patrick Carroll (R) Rick Merkt (R)
2002–2003[27] Anthony Bucco (R) Michael Patrick Carroll (R) Rick Merkt (R)
2004–2005[28] Anthony Bucco (R) Michael Patrick Carroll (R) Rick Merkt (R)
2006–2007 Michael Patrick Carroll (R) Rick Merkt (R)
2008–2009 Anthony Bucco (R) Michael Patrick Carroll (R) Rick Merkt (R)
2010–2011[29] Michael Patrick Carroll (R) Tony Bucco (R)
2012–2013 Anthony Bucco (R) Michael Patrick Carroll (R) Tony Bucco (R)
2014–2015[30] Anthony Bucco (R) Michael Patrick Carroll (R) Tony Bucco (R)
2016–2017 Michael Patrick Carroll (R) Tony Bucco (R)
  1. ^ Resigned February 22, 1982
  2. ^ Elected to the Assembly in April 1982 special election, sworn in on May 3, 1982
  3. ^ Resigned January 3, 1995 upon his election to Congress
  4. ^ Appointed to the Assembly on January 23, 1995

Election results[edit]

Senate[edit]

New Jersey general election, 1973[31]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican James H. Wallwork 30,552 54.2
Democratic Joel Wasserman 25,778 45.8
Total votes 56,330 100.0
New Jersey general election, 1977[32]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican James H. Wallwork 35,517 60.6
Democratic Lewis J. Paper 23,096 39.4
Total votes 58,613 100.0
New Jersey general election, 1981[33]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican John H. Dorsey 36,433 68.0
Democratic Horace Chamberlain 17,137 32.0
Total votes 53,570 100.0
New Jersey general election, 1983[34]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican John H. Dorsey 25,529 65.4
Democratic Allen Hantman 13,524 34.6
Total votes 39,053 100.0
New Jersey general election, 1987[35]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican John H. Dorsey 20,463 52.7
Democratic Gordon A. MacInnes 18,381 47.3
Total votes 38,844 100.0
New Jersey general election, 1991[36]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican John H. Dorsey 31,268 71.7
Democratic Adele Montgomery 12,363 28.3
Total votes 43,631 100.0
New Jersey general election, 1993[37]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Gordon A. MacInnes 34,646 50.3
Republican John H. Dorsey 34,291 49.7
Total votes 68,937 100.0
New Jersey general election, 1997[38][39]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Anthony R. Bucco 37,048 54.8
Democratic Gordon MacInnes 29,515 43.7
Conservative Joseph Long 1,033 1.5
Total votes 67,596 100.0
New Jersey general election, 2001[40]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Anthony R. Bucco 38,020 65.5
Democratic Horace Chamberlain 20,017 34.5
Total votes 58,037 100.0
New Jersey general election, 2003[41]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Anthony R. Bucco 22,163 55.1
Democratic Blair B. Mac Innes 18,060 44.9
Total votes 40,223 100.0
New Jersey general election, 2007[42]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Anthony Bucco 23,754 61.5
Democratic Frank Herbert 14,881 38.5
Total votes 38,635 100.0
New Jersey general election, 2011[43]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Anthony "Tony" Bucco 19,228 61.0
Democratic Rick Thoeni 12,298 39.0
Total votes 31,526 100.0
New Jersey general election, 2013[44]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Anthony "Tony" Bucco 36,517 86.8
Buck the Parties Maureen Castriotta 5,577 13.2
Total votes 42,094 100.0

Assembly[edit]

New Jersey general election, 1973[31]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Thomas H. Kean 32,708 29.2
Republican Jane Burgio 27,869 24.9
Democratic Thomas P. Giblin 26,790 23.9
Democratic Nicholas Saleeby 24,689 22.0
Total votes 112,056 100.0
New Jersey general election, 1975[45]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Thomas H. Kean 34,111 32.7
Republican Jane Burgio 32,077 30.7
Democratic Charles P. Cohen 18,528 17.8
Democratic Joseph C. Tucci 17,822 17.1
Tax Revolt Robert F. Herrmann 1,811 1.7
Total votes 104,349 100.0
New Jersey general election, 1977[32]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Jane Burgio 34,859 31.5
Republican Frederic Remington 30,754 27.8
Democratic Donald S. Coburn 23,424 21.2
Democratic Bernard Reiner 21,553 19.5
Total votes 110,590 100.0
New Jersey general election, 1979[46]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Jane Burgio 25,025 32.2
Republican Frederic Remington 20,258 26.1
Democratic Jim Bildner 18,294 23.5
Democratic Alexander A. Trento 14,120 18.2
Total votes 77,697 100.0
New Jersey general election, 1981[33]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican James J. Barry, Jr. 34,366 32.4
Republican Arthur R. Albohn 32,226 30.4
Democratic Stephen Young 20,270 19.1
Democratic Ed Baker 19,147 18.1
Total votes 106,009 100.0
Special election, April 20, 1982[47]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican William E. Bishop 7,132 42.9
Democratic Robert Johnson 6,330 38.1
A Clear Voice Rosemarie Totaro 3,161 19.0
Total votes 16,623 100.0
New Jersey general election, 1983[34]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Rodney P. Frelinghuysen 24,221 31.7
Republican Arthur R. Albohn 22,469 29.4
Democratic Jon Huston 15,025 19.7
Democratic Mark J. Malone 14,621 19.2
Total votes 76,336 100.0
New Jersey general election, 1985[48]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Rodney P. Frelinghuysen 31,695 37.1
Republican Arthur R. Albohn 29,043 34.0
Democratic Donald Cresitello 12,652 14.8
Democratic Carl A. Mottey 11,955 14.0
Total votes 85,345 100.0
New Jersey general election, 1987[35]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Rodney P. Frelinghuysen 27,896 43.1
Republican Arthur R. Albohn 23,537 36.4
Democratic George J. Stafford 13,233 20.5
Total votes 64,666 100.0
New Jersey general election, 1989[49]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Rodney P. Frelinghuysen 33,658 32.8
Republican Arthur R. Albohn 29,645 28.9
Democratic Kathleen Daley 21,029 20.5
Democratic George Stafford 18,290 17.8
Total votes 102,622 100.0
New Jersey general election, 1991[36]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Rodney P. Frelinghuysen 31,792 37.2
Republican Arthur R. Albohn 29,461 34.5
Democratic Ann Avram Huber 12,822 15.0
Democratic Marc N. Pindus 11,405 13.3
Total votes 85,480 100.0
New Jersey general election, 1993[37]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Rodney P. Frelinghuysen 48,596 36.9
Republican Arthur R. Albohn 41,015 31.2
Democratic Michael J. Andrisano 21,405 16.3
Democratic Randy Davis 19,731 15.0
Constitutionalize the Fed Mary Frueholz 801 0.6
Total votes 131,548 100.0
New Jersey general election, 1995[50]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Anthony R. Bucco 21,787 30.8
Republican Michael P. Carroll 20,215 28.6
Democratic Stephen D. Landfield 12,943 18.3
Democratic Stanley B. Yablonsky 12,795 18.1
Independent Joseph Long 1,495 2.1
Independent Jim Spinosa 1,478 2.1
Total votes 70,713 100.0
New Jersey general election, 1997[51][25]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Michael Patrick Carroll 37,935 31.8
Republican Rick Merkt 36,649 30.7
Democratic Chris Evangel 20,968 17.6
Democratic Harriet Lerner 20,967 17.6
Conservative James Spinosa 1,630 1.4
Conservative Stephen Spinosa 1,296 1.1
Total votes 119,445 100.0
New Jersey general election, 1999[52]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Rick Merkt 17,259 30.5
Republican Michael Patrick Carroll 17,204 30.4
Democratic Ronald J. Pellegrino 10,607 18.7
Democratic Gerald A. Nunan 10,018 17.7
Conservative James Spinosa 772 1.4
Conservative Stephen Spinosa 750 1.3
Total votes 56,610 100.0
New Jersey general election, 2001[53]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Michael Patrick Carroll 33,426 30.0
Republican Rick Merkt 33,414 30.0
Democratic Ann Huber 23,110 20.8
Democratic Dick Tighe 21,408 19.2
Total votes 111,358 100.0
New Jersey general election, 2003[54]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Michael P. Carroll 23,841 37.6
Republican Rick Merkt 23,525 37.1
Democratic Thomas A. Zelante 16,094 25.4
Total votes 63,460 100.0
New Jersey general election, 2005[55]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Richard A. Merkt 32,089 28.1
Republican Michael P. Carroll 30,636 26.8
Democratic Thomas Jackson 25,751 22.6
Democratic Janice Schindler 25,709 22.5
Total votes 114,185 100.0
New Jersey general election, 2007[56]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Rick Merkt 22,102 29.7
Republican Michael Patrick Carroll 21,468 28.9
Democratic Dana Wefer 16,001 21.5
Democratic Marshall L. Gates 14,780 19.9
Total votes 74,351 100.0
New Jersey general election, 2009[57]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Anthony Bucco 39,150 33.0
Republican Michael Patrick Carroll 38,188 32.2
Democratic Wendy Wright 21,431 18.0
Democratic Rebekah Conroy 20,010 16.8
Total votes 118,779 100.0
New Jersey general election, 2011[58]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Michael Patrick Carroll 18,481 30.0
Republican Anthony M. Bucco 18,218 29.5
Democratic Gale Heiss Colucci 12,564 20.4
Democratic George Stafford 12,432 20.2
Total votes 61,695 100.0
New Jersey general election, 2013[30]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Anthony M. Bucco 35,536 43.0
Republican Michael Patrick Carroll 33,393 40.4
Listen, Lead, Succeed Rebecca Feldman 9,209 11.2
Principle Before Politics Jack Curtis 4,426 5.4
Total votes 82,564 100.0
New Jersey general election, 2015[59]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Anthony M. Bucco 13,974 29.5
Republican Michael Patrick Carroll 13,372 28.2
Democratic Richard J. Corcoran III 10,230 21.6
Democratic Thomas Moran 9,849 20.8
Total votes 47,425 100.0

References[edit]

  1. ^ Districts by Number, New Jersey Legislature. Accessed February 11, 2014.
  2. ^ Municipalities (sorted by 2011 legislative district), New Jersey Department of State. Accessed February 11, 2014.
  3. ^ DP-1: Profile of General Population and Housing Characteristics: 2010 - 2010 Demographic Profile Data for General Assembly District 25 (2010), New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed February 11, 2014.
  4. ^ Statewide Voter Registration Summary, New Jersey Department of State, December 31, 2016. Accessed January 11, 2017.
  5. ^ District 25 Profile, Rutgers University. Accessed September 7, 2010.
  6. ^ 2005 New Jersey Legislative District Data Book. Edward J. Bloustein School of Planning and Public Policy. p. 114. 
  7. ^ "New Jersey Legislative Districts 1974–" (PDF). New Jersey Legislative Services Agency. 1973. Retrieved July 29, 2015. 
  8. ^ "New Jersey Legislative Districts" (PDF). 1981. Retrieved July 29, 2015. 
  9. ^ "1991 Legislative Districts" (PDF). 1991. Archived from the original (PDF) on March 4, 2016. Retrieved July 29, 2015. 
  10. ^ Legislative Districts, New Jersey Legislature, backed up by the Internet Archive as of December 6, 1998. Accessed September 7, 2010.
  11. ^ Legislative Roster 2016-2017 Session, New Jersey Legislature. Accessed January 16, 2016.
  12. ^ District 25 Legislators, New Jersey Legislature. Accessed January 16, 2016.
  13. ^ Staff. "FOR THE NEW JERSEY LEGISLATURE, 15 NEW FACES", The Philadelphia Inquirer, November 10, 1983. Accessed September 7, 2010. "Bishop filled the vacancy of Assemblyman James J. Barry Jr., who left the Assembly to become director of consumer affairs in the Kean administration."
  14. ^ "Frelinghuysen Upsets Bishop In 25th District". Bernardsville News. June 9, 1983. Retrieved July 29, 2015. (Subscription required (help)). 
  15. ^ "Official Results Candidates for the Offices of State Senate and General Assembly Primary Election June 7, 1983" (PDF). Secretary of State of New Jersey. 1983. p. 9. Retrieved July 29, 2015. 
  16. ^ Cichowski, John. "POWERFUL GOP SENATOR LOSES IN MORRIS -- DEMOCRAT MACINNES DEFEATS DORSEY IN SQUEAKER", The Record (Bergen County), November 3, 1993. Accessed September 7, 2010.
  17. ^ Cichowski, John. "GOP FILLS FRELINGHUYSEN'S SEAT", The Record (Bergen County), January 12, 1995. Accessed September 7, 2010.
  18. ^ Cichowski, John. "BUCCO WATCHES POLITICAL FORTUNES IMPROVE", The Record (Bergen County), June 8, 1995. Accessed September 7, 2010.
  19. ^ "Official List Primary Election Returns for the Office of General Assembly for Election Held June 6, 1995" (PDF). Secretary of State of New Jersey. July 6, 1995. Retrieved July 29, 2015. 
  20. ^ via Associated Press. "", The Press of Atlantic City, January 12, 1998. Accessed September 7, 2010. "Republican Rick Merkt won the Morris County seat left vacant by Bucco, and Republican Peter J. Biondi takes Kavanaugh's seat in Somerset County."
  21. ^ Melisurgo, Len. "Family feud in 25th District Assembly race in Morris County", The Star-Ledger, May 24, 2009. Accessed September 7, 2010.
  22. ^ Staff. "Somerset Hills voters support Republicans", The Bernardsville News, November 8, 2011. Accessed November 30, 2011.
  23. ^ Staff. "Vote Totals for the Elections Held on Tuesday in New York and New Jersey", The New York Times, November 9, 1989. Accessed June 23, 2010.
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  26. ^ Kocieniewski, David. "THE 1999 ELECTIONS: NEW JERSEY ASSEMBLY; Democrats Win Seats in Three Districts, Narrowing Republicans' Majority", The New York Times, November 3, 1999. Accessed September 7, 2010.
  27. ^ Staff. "THE 2001 ELECTIONS; RESULTS -- The Races for New Jersey", The New York Times, November 8, 2001. Accessed September 7, 2010.
  28. ^ Kocieniewski, David. "THE 2003 ELECTION: THE STATEHOUSE; Democrats Seize Senate And Widen Assembly Gap", The New York Times, November 5, 2003. Accessed June 23, 2010.
  29. ^ Staff. "2009 Election Results" Archived February 13, 2010, at the Wayback Machine., The New York Times, November 9, 2009. Accessed September 7, 2010.
  30. ^ a b Official List; Candidates for General Assembly For GENERAL ELECTION 11/05/2013 Election, New Jersey Department of State, December 4, 2013. Accessed February 11, 2014.
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  39. ^ "THE 1997 ELECTIONS: RESULTS; The Races for New Jersey Senate". The New York Times. Retrieved January 31, 2016. 
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  42. ^ "Official List, Candidate Returns for State Senate for November 2007 General Election" (PDF). Secretary of State of New Jersey. Retrieved January 31, 2016. 
  43. ^ "Official List, Candidate Returns for State Senate for November 2011 General Election" (PDF). Secretary of State of New Jersey. Retrieved January 31, 2016. 
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  45. ^ "Results of the General Election Held November 4, 1975" (PDF). Secretary of State of New Jersey. Retrieved January 31, 2016. 
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  48. ^ "Candidates for the Office of General Assembly" (PDF). Secretary of State of New Jersey. Retrieved January 31, 2016. 
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  59. ^ "Official List, Candidates for General Assembly for GENERAL ELECTION 11/03/2015 Election" (PDF). Secretary of State of New Jersey. Retrieved January 31, 2016.