25th Virginia Infantry

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25th Virginia Volunteer Infantry Regiment
Flag of Virginia (1861).png
Flag of Virginia, 1861
Active May 1861 – April 1865
Country  Confederate States of America
Allegiance  Virginia
Branch  Confederate States Army
Role Infantry
Nickname(s) Heck’s Regiment
Engagements American Civil War: Battle of Rich Mountain - Battle of Cheat Mountain-Jackson's Valley Campaign-Seven Days' Battles-Second Battle of Bull Run-Battle of Antietam-Battle of Fredericksburg-Siege of Suffolk-Battle of Gettysburg-Battle of Cold Harbor-Valley Campaigns of 1864-Appomattox Campaign
Disbanded April 1865
Commanders
Notable
commanders
Colonel George Hugh Smith
Lt. Colonel Robert D. Lilley

The 25th Virginia Volunteer Infantry Regiment was an infantry regiment raised in Virginia for service in the Confederate States Army during the American Civil War. It fought mostly with the Army of the Northwest and Army of Northern Virginia. Its brave soldiers saw action from the first battle (Philippi) until the last (Appomattox).

The 25th Virginia was organized during the early summer of 1861. Its members were raised in Upshur, Augusta, Highland, Bath, Pendleton, and Rockbridge counties. The unit participated in Lee's Cheat Mountain Campaign and Jackson's Valley Campaign. In the spring of 1862 the 9th Battalion, Virginia Infantry, four companies under the command of Lt. Colonel George W. Hansbrough that had served in the Army of the Northwest and fought at Greenbrier River and Camp Allegheny were merged into the 25th Virginia. After the July 11, 1861 battle of Rich Mountain, the regiment was severely depleted due to Col. Pegram's surrender of Camp Garnett. Members of 1st Co. A (Upshur Grays) and 1st Co. B (Rockbridge Guards) were dispatched to Hart's Farm under command of Capt. Julius A. DeLagnel to ward off an expected Federal assault. Men of the 20th VA and 25th VA, along with a lone cannon took position in the stable yard of the Hart farm and awaited the Federal assault. As the Federals appeared on the hillside, the long-awaited battle that the boys of Virginia had anticipated commenced. The small (310 men) force of Confederates held back the initial attacks, but overwhelming numbers, along with a final charge of the 19th Ohio forced the surviving members of the Confederate outpost to flee. The following morning, being cut off and surrounded, Col. Pegram surrendered the balance of his command at Camp Garnett, including the majority of the 25th VA. The 25th lost 5 killed, 11 wounded, and 2 captured at Hart's farm. Included in the dead were Upshur Gray privates Henry Clay Jackson and Oscar Sherwood, whose names can be seen engraved in the rock that they defended to this day.

After Jackson's campaign finished, the regiment was assigned to General Early's, J.R. Jones', and W.Terry's Brigade, Army of Northern Virginia. It took an active part in the campaigns of the army from the Seven Days' Battles to Cold Harbor, then fought with Early in the Shenandoah Valley and in various conflicts around Appomattox.

This regiment reported 18 casualties at Camp Alleghany, 72 at McDowell, and 29 at Cross Keys and Port Republic. It lost 1 killed and 24 wounded at Cedar Mountain, had 3 killed and 20 wounded at Sharpsburg, and reported 1 killed and 13 wounded at Fredericksburg. Of the 280 engaged at Gettysburg, twenty-five percent were disabled. There were 15 members (1 officer, 14 enlisted) of the 25th at Appomattox on April 9, 1865.(25th VA Inf. Richard Armstrong pg. 88)

The field officers were Colonels John C. Higginbotham, George A. Porterfield, and George H. Smith; Lieutenant Colonels Patrick B. Duffy, Jonathan McGee Heck, Robert D. Lilley, and John A. Robinson; and Majors Wilson Harper, Albert G. Reger, and William T. Thompson.

John B. Salling claimed to have been a peter monkey and saltpeter miner as a private in Company D, 25th Virginia Infantry, in Scott County, Virginia, during the Civil War, and claimed to be Virginia's last surviving Confederate veteran.

Companies[edit]

  • Company A, Upshur Grays, Col. John C. Higginbotham
  • Company B, Rockbridge Guards, Capt. David P. Curry
  • Company C, Augusta Lee Rifles, Capt. Robert D. Lilley
  • Company D, Highland Rangers, Capt. George M. Kiracafe
  • Company E, Pendleton Rifles, Capt. George H. Smith
  • Company F, Franklin Guards, Capt. John B. Moomau
  • Company G, Bath Grays/Bath Rifles, Capt. William D. Ervin
  • Company H, Hardy Blues, Capt. J.C.B. Mullin
  • Company I, Mt. Crawford Cavalry, formerly Valley Rifles, Capt. William N. Jordan
  • Company K, South Branch Riflemen, Capt. John H. Everly[1]

When the regiment was reorganized in 1862 to bring it back to full strength the following companies were added from the 9th Battalion Virginia Infantry

  • Company A, Letcher Guards, Capt. John A. Robinson
  • Company C, Braxton Blues, Capt. Patrick B. Duffy
  • Company E, Fighting Company E (composed from several parts of depleted companies)
  • Company G, Mollohan's Company, Capt. William H. Mollohan
  • Company I, Pocahontas Rescuers, Capt. Daniel A. Stofer
  • Company K, Pendleton Minute Men, Capt. D.C. Anderson (company transferred from the 31st Virginia Infantry to the 25th)[2]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Haselberger, Fritz, Yanks from the South, Past Glories, Baltimore, MD, 1987, pg. 87, list of companies.
  2. ^ Armstrong, Richard L., 25th Virginia Infantry and 9th Battalion Virginia Infantry, H.E. Howard, Inc., Lynchburg, 1990