260 Huberta

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260 Huberta
260Huberta (Lightcurve Inversion).png
A three-dimensional model of 260 Huberta based on its light curve.
Discovery
Discovered by Johann Palisa
Discovery date 3 October 1886
Designations
Named after
Hubertus
A906 VH, A911 ME
Main belt (Cybele)
Orbital characteristics[1]
Epoch 31 July 2016 (JD 2457600.5)
Uncertainty parameter 0
Observation arc 109.37 yr (39947 d)
Aphelion 3.84026 AU (574.495 Gm)
Perihelion 3.04743 AU (455.889 Gm)
3.44384 AU (515.191 Gm)
Eccentricity 0.11511
6.39 yr (2334.3 d)
16.05 km/s
110.638°
0° 9m 15.188s / day
Inclination 6.41599°
165.393°
180.996°
Earth MOID 2.03947 AU (305.100 Gm)
Jupiter MOID 1.57188 AU (235.150 Gm)
Jupiter Tisserand parameter 3.117
Physical characteristics
Dimensions 94.67±3.6 km
Mass unknown
Mean density
unknown
Equatorial surface gravity
unknown
Equatorial escape velocity
unknown
8.29 h (0.345 d)
0.0509±0.004
Temperature unknown
CX
8.97

260 Huberta is a large asteroid orbiting near the outer edge of the Main belt. It is dark and rich in carbon.

It belongs to the Cybele group of asteroids and may have been trapped in a 4:7 orbital resonance with Jupiter.

It was discovered by Johann Palisa on October 3, 1886 in Vienna and was named after Saint Hubertus.

References[edit]

External links[edit]