264 Libussa

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
264 Libussa
264Libussa (Lightcurve Inversion).png
A three-dimensional model of 264 Libussa based on its light curve.
Discovery
Discovered by C. H. F. Peters
Discovery date 22 December 1886
Designations
Named after
Libuše
Main belt
Orbital characteristics[1]
Epoch 31 July 2016 (JD 2457600.5)
Uncertainty parameter 0
Observation arc 123.02 yr (44934 d)
Aphelion 3.1799 AU (475.71 Gm)
Perihelion 2.41375 AU (361.092 Gm)
2.79681 AU (418.397 Gm)
Eccentricity 0.13696
4.68 yr (1708.4 d)
17.81 km/s
254.88°
0° 12m 38.592s / day
Inclination 10.426°
49.608°
340.891°
Earth MOID 1.42116 AU (212.603 Gm)
Jupiter MOID 2.25369 AU (337.147 Gm)
Jupiter Tisserand parameter 3.289
Physical characteristics
Dimensions 50.48±2.7 km
9.2276 h (0.38448 d)[1][2]
0.2971±0.034
S
8.42

264 Libussa is a Main belt asteroid that was discovered by C. H. F. Peters on December 22, 1886 in Clinton, New York and was named after Libussa, the legendary founder of Prague. It is classified as an S-type asteroid.

Photometric observations of this asteroid at the Organ Mesa Observatory in Las Cruces, New Mexico in 2008 gave an asymmetrical, bimodal light curve with a period of 9.2276 ± 0.0002 hours and a brightness variation of 0.33 ± 0.03 in magnitude.[2] Observation from the W. M. Keck Observatory show an angular size of 57 mas, which is close to the resolution limit of the instrument. The estimated maximum size of the asteroid is about 66 ± 7 km. It has an asymmetrical shape with a size ratio of more than 1.22 between the major and minor axes.[3]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Yeomans, Donald K., "264 Libussa", JPL Small-Body Database Browser, NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory, retrieved 11 May 2016. 
  2. ^ a b Pilcher, Frederick; Jardine, Don (April 2009), "Period Determinations for 31 Euphrosyne, 35 Leukothea 56 Melete, 137 Meliboea, 155 Scylla, and 264 Libussa", The Minor Planet Bulletin, 36 (2): 52–54, Bibcode:2009MPBu...36...52P 
  3. ^ Marchis, F.; et al. (November 2006), "Shape, size and multiplicity of main-belt asteroids. I. Keck Adaptive Optics survey", Icarus, 185 (1), pp. 39–63, Bibcode:2006Icar..185...39M, doi:10.1016/j.icarus.2006.06.001, PMC 2600456Freely accessible, PMID 19081813, retrieved 2013-03-27. 

External links[edit]