27.5 Mountain bike

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Merida Big Seven mountain bike with Schwalbe Racing Ralph 27.5" tires

27.5 mountain bikes, also called tweeners,[1] are mountain bikes which use a wheel that is approximately 27.5 inches in diameter with a large volume ISO 56-584 (27.5 x 2.25) mountain bike tire installed in a ISO 584 mm rim.[2][3][4][5][6] The wheel size is also known as "650B",[7][8] and is used as a "marketing term" by some manufacturers for their 27.5", the 650B has traditionally been a designation for a 26 inch diameter (ISO ~ 40-584 demi-ballon tire) using the same ISO 584 mm rim[9] used by French tandems, Porteurs and touring bicycles.[4][7][10]

The 27.5 inch are seen as a compromise between the two existing standards of the original 26 inch (ISO 559 mm rim) and recently emerged 29 inch mountain bikes. They were pioneered by Kirk Pacenti in 2007,[1][11] and as of 2013, at least 10 companies are launching models with 27.5 inch wheels,[4] and parts manufacturers are following suit.[2][5]

Nino Schurter won the World Cup event at Pietermaritzburg, South Africa,[6] and placed second in the Olympics in 2012 on 27.5 inch wheels.[3]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Josh Patterson (2012-03-22). "Catching Up With: Kirk Pacenti". Dirt Rag. Retrieved 2013-07-05. 
  2. ^ a b Michael Frank (April 16, 2013). "The New Mountain Bike Revolution: 27.5-Inch Wheels". Adventure Journal. Retrieved 2013-05-12. 
  3. ^ a b Lennard Zinn (April 24, 2013). "Back to 27.5". VeloNews. Retrieved 2013-05-12. 
  4. ^ a b c Matt Phillips (2013). "Reviewed: 27.5 Mountain Bikes for All Trails". Mountain Bike. Archived from the original on 2013-05-09. Retrieved 2013-05-12. 
  5. ^ a b Vernon Felton (2013). "Ready or Not, Here Comes 650". Bike Magazine. Retrieved 2013-05-12. 
  6. ^ a b Josh Patterson (Oct 9, 2012). "650b mountain bike wheels: looking at the trends". BikeRadar.com. Retrieved 2013-04-19. 
  7. ^ a b Sheldon Brown (December 6, 2012). "Tire Sizing Systems". Retrieved 2013-04-10. 
  8. ^ "The 650B Wheel Renaissance". RideYourBike.com. Retrieved 2013-04-10. 
  9. ^ www.rideyourbike.com The 650B Wheel Renaissance - Retrieved 2017-02-23.
  10. ^ www.bicyclequarterly.com Inside news from Bicycle Quarterly and Compass Bicycles - The Porteurs of Paris - Retrieved 2017-02-23.
  11. ^ James Huang (March 4, 2013). "NAHBS 2013: Kirk Pacenti's eecranks". Cyclingnews. Retrieved 2013-07-05. 

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