276 Adelheid

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276 Adelheid
276Adelheid (Lightcurve Inversion).png
A three-dimensional model of 276 Adelheid based on its light curve.
Discovery
Discovered by Johann Palisa
Discovery date 17 April 1888
Designations
Main belt
Orbital characteristics[1]
Epoch 31 July 2016 (JD 2457600.5)
Uncertainty parameter 0
Observation arc 116.91 yr (42700 d)
Aphelion 3.32977 AU (498.127 Gm)
Perihelion 2.90502 AU (434.585 Gm)
3.11740 AU (466.356 Gm)
Eccentricity 0.068127
5.50 yr (2010.4 d)
16.88 km/s
204.867°
0° 10m 44.641s / day
Inclination 21.6127°
211.168°
265.293°
Earth MOID 2.0128 AU (301.11 Gm)
Jupiter MOID 1.86662 AU (279.242 Gm)
Jupiter Tisserand parameter 3.105
Physical characteristics
Dimensions 121.60±7.7 km
6.315 h (0.2631 d)
0.0450±0.006[1]
0.045[2]
PC
8.6

276 Adelheid is a very large main-belt asteroid that was discovered by Austrian astronomer Johann Palisa on April 17, 1888, in Vienna.

This asteroid has a diameter of 122 km and a geometric albedo of 0.045.[2] Photometric observations in 1992 gave a light curve with a period of 6.328 ± 0.012 hours and a brightness variation of 0.10 ± 0.02 in magnitude. The curve is regular with two maxima and minima. This object has a spectrum that matches an X-type classification.[3]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Yeomans, Donald K., "276 Adelheid", JPL Small-Body Database Browser (NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory), retrieved 11 May 2016. 
  2. ^ a b Marciniak, A.; et al. (October 2007), "Photometry and models of selected main belt asteroids. IV. 184 Dejopeja, 276 Adelheid, 556 Phyllis", Astronomy and Astrophysics 473 (2): 633–639, Bibcode:2007A&A...473..633M, doi:10.1051/0004-6361:20077694. 
  3. ^ di Martino, M.; et al. (July 1995), "Intermediate size asteroids: Photoelectric photometry of 8 objects.", Astronomy and Astrophysics Supplement 112, pp. 1–7, Bibcode:1995A&AS..112....1D. 

External links[edit]