2839 Annette

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2839 Annette
2839Annette (Lightcurve Inversion).png
Light curve-based 3D model of 2839 Annette
Discovery [1]
Discovered by C. W. Tombaugh
Discovery site Flagstaff (LO)
Discovery date 5 October 1929
Designations
MPC designation 2839 Annette
Named after
Clyde Tombaugh's daughter[2]
1929 TP · 1937 AB1
1939 UL · 1962 TE
1970 BB · 1972 XF1
1982 VP
main-belt
Orbital characteristics[1]
Epoch 13 January 2016 (JD 2457400.5)
Uncertainty parameter 0
Observation arc 86.47 yr (31582 days)
Aphelion 2.5478 AU (381.15 Gm)
Perihelion 1.8850 AU (281.99 Gm)
2.2164 AU (331.57 Gm)
Eccentricity 0.14951
3.30 yr (1205.2 d)
21.705°
0° 17m 55.284s / day
Inclination 4.8074°
44.584°
6.5562°
Earth MOID 0.894533 AU (133.8202 Gm)
Jupiter MOID 2.80931 AU (420.267 Gm)
Jupiter Tisserand parameter 3.634
Physical characteristics
10.4595 h (0.43581 d)
12.9

2839 Annette, provisional designation 1929 TP, is a main-belt asteroid, discovered by Clyde Tombaugh during his search for Pluto at the Lowell Observatory, Flagstaff, on October 5, 1929.[1]

Photometric observations of the asteroid during 2005 at the Palmer Divide Observatory in Colorado Springs, Colorado, were used to generate a light curve with a period of 10.457 ± 0.003 hours and a variation in brightness of 0.92 ± 0.03 magnitude.[3]

The asteroid was named after Clyde Tombaugh's daughter, Annette.[2]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c "JPL Small-Body Database Browser: 2839 Annette (1929 TP)" (2015-09-20 last obs.). Jet Propulsion Laboratory. Retrieved 15 April 2016. 
  2. ^ a b Schmadel, Lutz D. (2003). Dictionary of Minor Planet Names – (2839) Annette. Springer Berlin Heidelberg. p. 232. ISBN 978-3-540-29925-7. Retrieved 15 October 2015. 
  3. ^ Warner, Brian D. (September 2006), "Asteroid lightcurve analysis at the Palmer Divide Observatory - late 2005 and early 2006", The Minor Planet Bulletin, 33: 58–62, Bibcode:2006MPBu...33...58W. 

External links[edit]