2 Camelopardalis

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2 Camelopardalis
Observation data
Epoch J2000      Equinox J2000
Constellation Camelopardalis
Right ascension 04h 39m 58.07002s[1]
Declination +53° 28′ 22.9163″[1]
Apparent magnitude (V) 5.36[2]
Characteristics
2 Cam A
Spectral type A8V[3]
U−B color index +0.05[2]
B−V color index +0.34[2]
Astrometry
Radial velocity (Rv) 20.10 ± 3.2[4] km/s
Proper motion (μ) RA: 34.51[1] mas/yr
Dec.: −84.70[1] mas/yr
Parallax (π) 22.49 ± 4.69[1] mas
Distance approx. 150 ly
(approx. 44 pc)
Orbit[5]
Primary 2 Cam A
Companion 2 Cam B
Period (P) 26.65 yr
Semi-major axis (a) 0.174
Eccentricity (e) 0.86
Inclination (i) 141.0°
Longitude of the node (Ω) 20.8°
Periastron epoch (T) B 1988.90
Argument of periastron (ω)
(secondary)
51.5°
Orbit[5]
Primary 2 Cam AB
Companion 2 Cam C
Period (P) 480.75 ± 3.81 yr
Semi-major axis (a) 1.514 ± 0.038
Eccentricity (e) 0.229 ± 0.012
Inclination (i) 128.4 ± 0.7°
Longitude of the node (Ω) 110.8 ± 0.8°
Periastron epoch (T) B 2027.79 ± 3.26
Argument of periastron (ω)
(secondary)
307.1 ± 5.0°
Details[6]
2 Cam A
Mass 2.4 M
2 Cam B
Mass 1.4 M
2 Cam C
Mass 3.2 M
Other designations
BD+53° 794, HD 29316, HIP 21730, HR 1466, SAO 24744, ADS 3358 ABC, CCDM J04400+5328ABC
Database references
SIMBAD 2 Cam
2 Cam AB
2 Cam C

2 Camelopardalis (abbreviated to 2 Cam), is a star system in the constellation of Camelopardalis. The system is located about 150 light-years (44 parsecs) away, based on its parallax.[1]

The primary component of 2 Camelopardalis, designated A, is a main-sequence star with a spectral type of A8V. It has an apparent magnitude of 5.86, and has a component with an apparent magnitude of 7.35, designated B.[5] The two orbit each other on a very eccentric orbit with a period of 26.65 years.[5] Further out, there is another eight-magnitude star (designated C), orbiting once every few hundred years.[5] Because the third star is relatively massive, it is possible that it may be a binary star itself.[6]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f van Leeuwen, F.; et al. (2007). "Validation of the new Hipparcos reduction". Astronomy and Astrophysics. 474 (2): 653–664. Bibcode:2007A&A...474..653V. arXiv:0708.1752Freely accessible. doi:10.1051/0004-6361:20078357. 
  2. ^ a b c Mermilliod, J.-C. (1986). "Compilation of Eggen's UBV data, transformed to UBV (unpublished)". Catalogue of Eggen's UBV data. Bibcode:1986EgUBV........0M. 
  3. ^ Appenzeller, Immo (1967). "MK Spectral Types for 185 Bright Stars". Publications of the Astronomical Society of the Pacific. 79 (467): 102. Bibcode:1967PASP...79..102A. doi:10.1086/128449. 
  4. ^ Holmberg, J.; Nordström, B.; Andersen, J. (2007). "The Geneva-Copenhagen survey of the Solar neighbourhood II". Astronomy and Astrophysics. 475 (2): 519. Bibcode:2007A&A...475..519H. arXiv:0707.1891Freely accessible. doi:10.1051/0004-6361:20077221. 
  5. ^ a b c d e "Sixth Catalog of Orbits of Visual Binary Stars". United States Naval Observatory. Retrieved 4 April 2017. 
  6. ^ a b Heintz, W. D. (1996). "A Study of Multiple-Star Systems". The Astronomical Journal. 111: 408. Bibcode:1996AJ....111..408H. doi:10.1086/117792.