2nd Panzer Army

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2nd Panzer Army (2.Panzerarmee)
Deut.2.PzArmee-Abzeichen.svg
Insignia of the 2nd Panzer Group / 2nd Panzer Army
Active October 5, 1941 - May 8, 1945
Country  Germany
Type Tank Army
Engagements Eastern Front and the Balkans, World War II
Commanders
Notable
commanders
Generaloberst Heinz Guderian

The 2nd Panzer Army (German: 2. Panzerarmee) was a German armoured formation during World War II, formed from the 2nd Panzer Group on October 5, 1941. 2nd Panzer Group was originally designated as Panzer Group Guderian.[citation needed]

Organisation[edit]

Panzer Group Guderian (German: Panzergruppe Guderian) was formed on 5 June 1940 and named after its commander, general Heinz Guderian. In early June 1940, after reaching the English Channel following the breakthrough in the Ardennes, the Panzergruppe Guderian was formed from the XIX Armeekorps, and thrust deep into France, cutting off the Maginot Line. In November 1940, it was upgraded into Panzergruppe 2.

The 2nd Panzer Group (German: Panzergruppe 2) was formed in November 1940 from Panzer Group Guderian. In October 1941 it was renamed the 2nd Panzer Army. Panzer Group 2 played a significant role in the early stages of the German invasion of the Soviet Union during Operation Barbarossa in 1941 when it was a constituent part of Army Group Centre.

Operational history[edit]

2nd Panzer Group was part of the Army Group Centre during Operation Barbarossa, the invasion of the Soviet Union. Guderian's 2nd Panzer Army formed the southern pincer while Hoth's 3rd Panzer Army formed the Northern pincer destroying several Soviet armies during the opening phase of Operation Barbarossa. During the battles of Bialystok and Minsk substantial amount of prisoners were captured and several weapons captured.

Suffering heavy losses in men and equipment, the German forces advanced deeper into the Soviet Union. The rasputitsa season (literally "roadlessness", due to heavy rains and sluggish muddy roads) began to slow down the formation's progress to a few kilometres a day. The rasputitsa was not an unusual phenomenon, but the Wehrmacht did not prepare for this contingency as the German high command had expected the German army to be in Moscow and beyond at this time, with the campaign over before the end of summer. After Minsk, the 2nd and 3rd Panzer Armies captured Smolensk in another successful pincer operation taking around 300,000 prisoners.

Hitler ordered Army Group Center to detach the 2nd Panzer Group, which was to turn southward towards Kiev to form the northern pincer at Kiev. Guderian's 2nd Panzer Army and Kleist's 1st Panzer Army locked in a pincer around Kiev to trap 665,000 Soviet prisoners. After concluding the Kiev encirclement, the German planned for the three Panzer armies to attack Moscow from different directions. 4th Panzer Army in the North around Leningrad would attack southward. Hoth's 3rd Panzer Army would attack eastward towards Moscow, while 2nd Panzer Army would turn northwest and attack Moscow from the south.

The Group's divisions had suffered heavy attrition since the beginning of invasion, and experienced shortages in fuel and ammunition due to the breakdown in logistics. By November, the situation of Guderian's Panzer Group was dire. Nonetheless, expecting the Red Army's resistance to finally collapse and driven by National Socialist military thinking, including the idea that the "will" was key to success, Guderian continued to direct his forces to attack. By early December, the final advance on Moscow failed in the face of stiffening Soviet resistance and due to shortages in men and materiel.

War crimes[edit]

As all German armies on the Eastern Front, Panzer Group 2 implemented the criminal Commissar Order during Operation Barbarossa.[1] In September 1942, the 2nd Panzer Army took part in war crimes while conducting anti-guerrilla operations in the Soviet Union. These operations killed at least a thousand people, razed entire villages, and deported over 18,500. During these operations, Jews and suspected partisans were murdered by being forced to drag ploughs through minefields.[2]

In August 1943, the army's headquarters was subordinated to Army Group F and transferred to the Balkans for anti-partisan operations. From September to December 1943. III (Germanic) SS Panzer Corps was subordinated to the army. Subsequently the army became primarily an infantry formation at this point and would not command another panzer division until February 1945.

The army headquarters with some units was subsequently transferred to Hungary as part of Army Group South in January 1945. 2nd Panzer Army took part in the Battle of the Transdanubian Hills in March 1945 prior to surrendering in Austria at the end of the war.

Commanders[edit]

Order of battle[edit]

Organization of Panzer Group Guderian on 28 May 1940

Group Corps Division
Panzer Group Guderian
General der Panzertruppe Heinz Guderian
XXXIX Army Corps (mot.)
Generalleutnant Rudolf Schmidt
1st Panzer Division
Generalleutnant Friedrich Kirchner
2nd Panzer Division
Generalleutnant Rudolf Veiel
29th Infantry Division (mot.)
Generalmajor Willibald Freiherr von Langermann und Erlencamp
XXXXI Army Corps
Generalleutnant Georg-Hans Reinhardt
6th Panzer Division
Generalmajor Werner Kempf
8th Panzer Division
Generalleutnant Adolf-Friedrich Kuntzen
20th Infantry Division (mot.)
Generalleutnant Mauritz von Wiktorin

June 22, 1941[edit]

Group Corps Division / Regiment
2nd Panzer Group
Generaloberst
Heinz Guderian
XXIV Panzer Corps


Leo Geyr von Schweppenburg

3rd Panzer Division
4th Panzer Division
10th Infantry Division
1st Cavalry Division
XLVI Panzer Corps 10th Panzer Division
SS Infantry Division Das Reich (mot.)
Infantry Regiment Großdeutschland
XLVII Panzer Corps 17th Panzer Division
18th Panzer Division
29th Infantry Division (mot.)
Anti-Aircraft Regiment Hermann Göring

July 27, 1941[edit]

Group Corps Division / Regiment
2nd Panzer Group[3]


Generaloberst
Heinz Guderian

VII Corps 7th Infantry Division
23rd Infantry Division
78th Infantry Division
197th Infantry Division
XX Corps 15th Infantry Division
268th Infantry Division
IX Corps 263rd Infantry Division
292nd Infantry Division
137th Infantry Division
XLVI Panzer Corps 10th Panzer Division
SS Infantry Division Das Reich (mot.)
Infantry Regiment Großdeutschland
XXIV Panzer Corps 3rd Panzer Division
4th Panzer Division
10th Infantry Division (mot.)
XLVII Panzer Corps 18th Panzer Division
17th Panzer Division
29th Infantry Division (mot.)

September 30, 1941[edit]

Group Corps Division / Regiment
2nd Panzer Group
Generaloberst
Heinz Guderian
XLVIII Panzer Corps 9th Panzer Division
16th Infantry Division (mot.)
25th Infantry Division (mot.)
XXIV Panzer Corps 3rd Panzer Division
4th Panzer Division
10th Infantry Division (mot.)
XLVII Panzer Corps 17th Panzer Division
18th Panzer Division
20th Infantry Division (mot.)
XXXIV Corps 45th Infantry Division
135th Infantry Division
XXXV Corps 296th Infantry Division
95th Infantry Division
1st Cavalry Division

November 30, 1943[edit]

Group Corps Division / Regiment
2nd Panzer Army
Generaloberst
Lothar Rendulic
III SS Panzer Corps 11th SS Panzergrenadier Division Nordland
SS Panzer Grenadier Brigade Nederland
V SS Mountain Corps 7th SS Division Prinz Eugen
118th Jäger Division
181st Infantry Division
369th (Croatian) Infantry Division
1st Mountain Division
XV Mountain Corps 1st Cossack Division
114th Jäger Division
264th Infantry Division
371st Infantry Division
373rd (Croatian) Infantry Division
XXI Mountain Corps 100th Jäger Division
297th Infantry Division
LXIX Reserve Corps 173rd Reserve Division
187th Reserve Division
367th Infantry Division

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ Stahel 2015, p. 28.
  2. ^ www.verbrechen-der-wehrmacht.de p. 22
  3. ^ Glantz, David, Barbarossa Derailed: The battle for Smolensk, Volume 2, November 2010, page 54

Sources[edit]