30–30 club

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An African-American man in a white baseball uniform with "GIANTS" on the chest takes a left-handed baseball swing as a catcher kneels behind him to receive the pitch.
Barry Bonds joined the 30–30 club in five seasons, a record he shares with his father Bobby.

In Major League Baseball (MLB), the 30–30 club is the group of batters who have collected 30 home runs and 30 stolen bases in a single season.[1][2] Ken Williams was the first to achieve this, doing so in 1922.[3][4] He remained the sole member of the club for 34 years until Willie Mays achieved consecutive 30–30 seasons in 1956 and 1957.[4][5] Bobby Bonds became the club's fourth member in 1969 and became the first player in MLB history to reach the 30–30 club on three occasions and ultimately on five occasions,[5][6] subsequently achieving the milestone in 1973, 1975, 1977 and 1978.[4] He remained the only player to accomplish this until 1997, when his son Barry Bonds achieved his fifth 30–30 season.[4]

In total, 40 players have reached the 30–30 club in MLB history and 13 have done so more than once. Of these 40 players, 27 were right-handed batters, eight were left-handed and five were switch hitters, meaning they could bat from either side of the plate. The Cincinnati Reds, Cleveland Indians, Colorado Rockies and New York Mets are the only franchises to have three players reach the milestone. Five players—Hank Aaron, Barry Bonds, Willie Mays, Alex Rodriguez and Sammy Sosa—are also members of the 500 home run club,[7] and Aaron, Mays and Rodriguez are also members of the 3,000 hit club.[8] Dale Murphy, Jose Canseco, Barry Bonds, Larry Walker, Jimmy Rollins and Braun won the Most Valuable Player (MVP) Award in the same year as their 30–30 season, with Bonds achieving this on two occasions (1990 and 1992).[9] Both Mays and Rollins also reached the 20–20–20 club in the same season, that being Mays second 30–30 season, and in Rollins only 30–30 season.[10][11][12] Four players accomplished 30–30 seasons in 1987, 1996, 1997 and 2011, the most in a single season.[4]

Due to the rarity of a player excelling in the combination of hitting home runs and stealing bases,[5] Baseball Digest called the 30–30 club "the most celebrated feat that can be achieved by a player who has both power and speed."[2] Of the 22 members eligible for the Baseball Hall of Fame, five have been elected and two were elected on the first ballot. Eligibility requires that a player has "been retired five seasons" or deceased for at least six months,[13] disqualifying nine active players and six players who have been retired for less than five seasons.

Members[edit]

Black-and-white photo of Willie Mays, smiling in a San Francisco Giants hat
Willie Mays became the first player to achieve multiple 30–30 seasons and accomplish them in back-to-back seasons.[2][5]
A black-and-white photo of Hank Aaron
Hank Aaron is one of five 30–30 club members to be inducted into the Baseball Hall of Fame.
Barry Larkin follows through after a hit, wearing a Cincinnati Reds uniform
Barry Larkin attained 30–30 in 1996.
With baseball in hand, an African-American man wearing a white and red Nationals baseball uniform cocks his arm backward as he prepares to throw
Alfonso Soriano reached the 30–30 club in four seasons, second only to Bobby and Barry Bonds.
Ryan Braun, wearing a dark blue Brewers uniform, yields a baseball bat
Ryan Braun is the most recent player to reach the 30–30 club in multiple seasons (2011 and 2012).
José Ramírez with glove and a ball, looking at the camera
José Ramírez joined the 30–30 club in 2018.
Mookie Betts batting and hitting the ball
Mookie Betts was the second player to join the 30–30 club in 2018.
Key
Year The year the player's 30–30 season occurred
Player (X) Name of the player and number of 30–30 seasons they had accomplished at that point
Italics Player achieved the 40–40 club that year
Team The player's team for his 30–30 season
HR Number of home runs in that year
SB Number of stolen bases in that year
^ Denotes 40–40 season
Elected to the Baseball Hall of Fame Elected to the Baseball Hall of Fame
Active player Player is active
Members of the 30–30 club
Year Player Team HR SB Ref
1922 Ken Williams St. Louis Browns 39 37 [14]
1956 Willie MaysElected to the Baseball Hall of Fame New York Giants 36 40 [12]
1957 Willie MaysElected to the Baseball Hall of Fame (2) New York Giants 35 38 [12]
1963 Hank AaronElected to the Baseball Hall of Fame Milwaukee Braves 44 31 [15]
1969 Bobby Bonds San Francisco Giants 32 45 [16]
1970 Tommy Harper Milwaukee Brewers 31 38 [17]
1973 Bobby Bonds (2) San Francisco Giants 39 43 [16]
1975 Bobby Bonds (3) New York Yankees 32 30 [16]
1977 Bobby Bonds (4) California Angels 37 41 [16]
1978 Bobby Bonds (5) Chicago White Sox
Texas Rangers
31 43 [16]
1983 Dale Murphy Atlanta Braves 36 30 [18]
1987 Joe Carter Cleveland Indians 32 31 [19]
1987 Eric Davis Cincinnati Reds 37 50 [20]
1987 Howard Johnson New York Mets 36 32 [21]
1987 Darryl Strawberry New York Mets 39 36 [22]
1988 José Canseco Oakland Athletics 42^ 40^ [23]
1989 Howard Johnson (2) New York Mets 36 41 [21]
1990 Barry Bonds Pittsburgh Pirates 33 52 [24]
1990 Ron Gant Atlanta Braves 32 33 [25]
1991 Ron Gant (2) Atlanta Braves 32 34 [25]
1991 Howard Johnson (3) New York Mets 38 30 [21]
1992 Barry Bonds (2) Pittsburgh Pirates 34 39 [24]
1993 Sammy Sosa Chicago Cubs 33 36 [26]
1995 Barry Bonds (3) San Francisco Giants 33 31 [24]
1995 Sammy Sosa (2) Chicago Cubs 36 34 [26]
1996 Dante Bichette Colorado Rockies 31 31 [27]
1996 Barry Bonds (4) San Francisco Giants 42^ 40^ [24]
1996 Ellis Burks Colorado Rockies 40 32 [28]
1996 Barry LarkinElected to the Baseball Hall of Fame Cincinnati Reds 33 36 [29]
1997 Jeff BagwellElected to the Baseball Hall of Fame Houston Astros 43 31 [30]
1997 Barry Bonds (5) San Francisco Giants 40 37 [24]
1997 Raúl Mondesí Los Angeles Dodgers 30 32 [31]
1997 Larry Walker Colorado Rockies 49 33 [32]
1998 Shawn Green Toronto Blue Jays 35 35 [33]
1998 Alex Rodriguez Seattle Mariners 42^ 46^ [34]
1999 Jeff Bagwell (2)Elected to the Baseball Hall of Fame Houston Astros 42 30 [30]
1999 Raúl Mondesí (2) Los Angeles Dodgers 33 36 [31]
2000 Preston Wilson Florida Marlins 31 36 [35]
2001 Bobby Abreu Philadelphia Phillies 31 36 [36]
2001 José Cruz, Jr. Toronto Blue Jays 34 32 [37]
2001 Vladimir GuerreroElected to the Baseball Hall of Fame Montreal Expos 34 37 [38]
2002 Vladimir Guerrero (2)Elected to the Baseball Hall of Fame Montreal Expos 39 40 [38]
2002 Alfonso Soriano New York Yankees 39 41 [39]
2003 Alfonso Soriano (2) New York Yankees 38 35 [39]
2004 Bobby Abreu (2) Philadelphia Phillies 30 40 [36]
2004 Carlos Beltrán Kansas City Royals
Houston Astros
38 42 [40]
2005 Alfonso Soriano (3) Texas Rangers 36 30 [39]
2006 Alfonso Soriano (4) Washington Nationals 46^ 41^ [39]
2007 David Wright New York Mets 30 34 [41]
2007 Jimmy Rollins Philadelphia Phillies 30 41 [42]
2007 Brandon PhillipsActive player Cincinnati Reds 30 32 [43]
2008 Grady Sizemore Cleveland Indians 33 38 [44]
2008 Hanley RamírezActive player Florida Marlins 33 35 [45]
2009 Ian KinslerActive player Texas Rangers 31 30 [46]
2011 Matt KempActive player Los Angeles Dodgers 39 40 [47]
2011 Ryan BraunActive player Milwaukee Brewers 33 33 [48]
2011 Jacoby EllsburyActive player Boston Red Sox 32 39 [49]
2011 Ian KinslerActive player (2) Texas Rangers 32 30 [46]
2012 Ryan BraunActive player (2) Milwaukee Brewers 41 30 [48]
2012 Mike TroutActive player Los Angeles Angels 30 49 [50]
2018 José RamírezActive player Cleveland Indians 39 34 [51]
2018 Mookie BettsActive player Boston Red Sox 32 30 [52]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

General

  • "30–30 Club". Baseball-Almanac.com. Baseball Almanac. Retrieved July 4, 2012.
  • "The 30–30 Club – Rare Feats". MLB.com. Major League Baseball. Retrieved July 4, 2012.

Specific

  1. ^ Dorfman, John (April 17, 2011). "His 30–30 club has 5 stocks as stars". Omaha.com (Bloomberg News). Archived from the original on January 31, 2013. Retrieved June 24, 2012. In baseball, the club is for ballplayers who belt 30 home runs and steal 30 bases in the same season.
  2. ^ a b c Deane, Bill (May 1987). "Here Are Top Candidates To Join Elite '30–30' Club". Baseball Digest. Evanston, Illinois: Century Publishing. 46 (5): 34. ISSN 0005-609X. Retrieved July 8, 2012.[permanent dead link]
  3. ^ Vass, George (July 2004). "Baseball's Forgotten Stars". Baseball Digest. Evanston, Illinois: Century Publishing. 63 (7): 31. ISSN 0005-609X. Retrieved July 9, 2012.[permanent dead link]
  4. ^ a b c d e Newman, Mark (August 30, 2011). "Versatile crop of players could join 30–30 club". MLB.com. Retrieved June 25, 2012.
  5. ^ a b c d Stewart, Wayne (May 1990). "Blend of Power and Speed: A Major League Rarity". Baseball Digest. Evanston, Illinois: Century Publishing. 49 (5): 34–35. ISSN 0005-609X. Retrieved July 8, 2012.[permanent dead link]
  6. ^ Dorfman, John (April 12, 2010). "Three Stocks Take Top Honors In Elite 30–30 Club". Bloomberg. Retrieved June 25, 2012. Bobby Bonds and his son Barry Bonds each did it five times.
  7. ^ "Career Leaders & Records for Home Runs". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved July 4, 2012.
  8. ^ "Career Leaders & Records for Hits". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved July 4, 2012.
  9. ^ "Most Valuable Player MVP Awards & Cy Young Awards Winners". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved May 24, 2012.
  10. ^ "Rollins gets 20th triple and joins rare 20–20–20–20 club". ESPN. ESPN Internet Ventures. Associated Press. September 30, 2007. Retrieved July 21, 2012.
  11. ^ Tsao, Bryan; Bolado, Carolina; Distelheim, Joe (November 30, 2007). The Hardball Times Baseball Annual 2008. ACTA Publications. p. 26. ISBN 9780879463410. Retrieved July 8, 2012. Wasn't Jimmy Rollins...the key to this offense? Thirty home runs, more than 200 hits, the fourth 20–20–20–20 (doubles, triples, home runs and stolen bases) player in the history of the game.
  12. ^ a b c "Willie Mays Statistics and History". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved May 8, 2012.
  13. ^ "Rules for Election". National Baseball Hall of Fame. Retrieved July 4, 2012.
  14. ^ "Ken Williams Statistics and History". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved June 25, 2012.
  15. ^ "Hank Aaron Statistics and History". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved June 25, 2012.
  16. ^ a b c d e "Bobby Bonds Statistics and History". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved June 25, 2012.
  17. ^ "Tommy Harper Statistics and History". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved June 25, 2012.
  18. ^ "Dale Murphy Statistics and History". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved June 25, 2012.
  19. ^ "Joe Carter Statistics and History". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved June 25, 2012.
  20. ^ "Eric Davis Statistics and History". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved June 25, 2012.
  21. ^ a b c "Howard Johnson Statistics and History". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved June 25, 2012.
  22. ^ "Darryl Strawberry Statistics and History". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved June 25, 2012.
  23. ^ "Jose Canseco Statistics and History". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved May 10, 2012.
  24. ^ a b c d e "Barry Bonds Statistics and History". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved May 10, 2012.
  25. ^ a b "Ron Gant Statistics and History". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved June 25, 2012.
  26. ^ a b "Sammy Sosa Statistics and History". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved June 25, 2012.
  27. ^ "Dante Bichette Statistics and History". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved June 25, 2012.
  28. ^ "Ellis Burks Statistics and History". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved June 25, 2012.
  29. ^ "Barry Larkin Statistics and History". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved June 25, 2012.
  30. ^ a b "Jeff Bagwell Statistics and History". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved June 25, 2012.
  31. ^ a b "Raúl Mondesí Statistics and History". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved June 25, 2012.
  32. ^ "Larry Walker Statistics and History". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved June 25, 2012.
  33. ^ "Shawn Green Statistics and History". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved June 25, 2012.
  34. ^ "Alex Rodriguez Statistics and History". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved May 10, 2012.
  35. ^ "Preston Wilson Statistics and History". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved June 25, 2012.
  36. ^ a b "Bobby Abreu Statistics and History". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved June 25, 2012.
  37. ^ "José Cruz Statistics and History". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved June 25, 2012.
  38. ^ a b "Vladimir Guerrero Statistics and History". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved June 25, 2012.
  39. ^ a b c d "Alfonso Soriano Statistics and History". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved May 10, 2012.
  40. ^ "Carlos Beltrán Statistics and History". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved June 25, 2012.
  41. ^ "David Wright Statistics and History". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved June 25, 2012.
  42. ^ "Jimmy Rollins Statistics and History". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved May 8, 2012.
  43. ^ "Brandon Phillips Statistics and History". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved June 25, 2012.
  44. ^ "Grady Sizemore Statistics and History". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved June 25, 2012.
  45. ^ "Hanley Ramírez Statistics and History". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved June 25, 2012.
  46. ^ a b "Ian Kinsler Statistics and History". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved June 25, 2012.
  47. ^ "Matt Kemp Statistics and History". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved June 25, 2012.
  48. ^ a b "Ryan Braun Statistics and History". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved June 25, 2012.
  49. ^ "Jacoby Ellsbury Statistics and History". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved June 25, 2012.
  50. ^ "Mike Trout Statistics and History". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved September 30, 2012.
  51. ^ "Jose Ramirez Statistics and History". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved September 9, 2018.
  52. ^ "Mookie Betts Statistics and History". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved September 26, 2018.