3073 Kursk

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3073 Kursk
Discovery [1]
Discovered by N. Chernykh
Discovery site CrAO (Nauchnyj)
Discovery date 24 September 1979
Designations
MPC designation 3073 Kursk
Named after
Kursk[2]
1979 SW11 · 1969 VG1
main-belt
Orbital characteristics[1]
Epoch 13 January 2016 (JD 2457400.5)
Uncertainty parameter 0
Observation arc 16708 days (45.74 yr)
Aphelion 2.5483 AU (381.22 Gm)
Perihelion 1.9372 AU (289.80 Gm)
2.2427 AU (335.50 Gm)
Eccentricity 0.13624
3.36 yr (1226.8 d)
248.42°
0° 17m 36.456s / day
Inclination 5.0357°
204.12°
232.20°
Known satellites 1
1.67 km diameter[3]
Earth MOID 0.956076 AU (143.0269 Gm)
Jupiter MOID 2.70305 AU (404.371 Gm)
Jupiter Tisserand parameter 3.616
Physical characteristics
3.4468 h (0.14362 d)
13.5

3073 Kursk, provisionally known as 1979 SW11, is a main-belt binary asteroid discovered on September 24, 1979 by N. Chernykh at Nauchnyj.[1] A 1.67 kilometer-large moon was discovered orbiting the asteroid in 1 day, 20 hours, and 57 minutes.[3]

It is named after the old Russian city Kursk.[2]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c "JPL Small-Body Database Browser: 3073 Kursk (1979 SW11)" (2015-08-10 last obs.). Jet Propulsion Laboratory. Retrieved 14 April 2016. 
  2. ^ a b Schmadel, Lutz D. (2003). Dictionary of Minor Planet Names – (3073) Kursk. Springer Berlin Heidelberg. p. 253. ISBN 978-3-540-29925-7. Retrieved 10 October 2015. 
  3. ^ a b Johnston, Robert. "(3073) Kursk". johnstonsarchive.net. Retrieved 28 May 2015. 

External links[edit]