307 Nike

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
307 Nike
Discovery
Discovered by Auguste Charlois
Discovery site Nice
Discovery date 5 March 1891
Designations
Named after
Nike
1957 LM
Main belt
Orbital characteristics[1]
Epoch 31 July 2016 (JD 2457600.5)
Uncertainty parameter 0
Observation arc 125.12 yr (45699 d)
Aphelion 3.3226 AU (497.05 Gm)
Perihelion 2.4899 AU (372.48 Gm)
2.9063 AU (434.78 Gm)
Eccentricity 0.14327
4.95 yr (1809.7 d)
17.46 km/s
170.550°
0° 11m 56.148s / day
Inclination 6.1260°
100.966°
324.764°
Earth MOID 1.50514 AU (225.166 Gm)
Jupiter MOID 1.97985 AU (296.181 Gm)
Jupiter Tisserand parameter 3.261
Physical characteristics
Dimensions 54.96±3.3 km
7.902 h (0.3293 d)[1]
7.902 ± 0.005 h[2]
0.0524±0.007
Surface temp. min mean max
Kelvin[3] 151 K 161 K 174 K
Celsius -122°C -112°C -99°C
Fahrenheit -187.6°F -169.6°F -146.2°F
C
10.12

307 Nike is a sizeable asteroid of the main belt. It was discovered by Auguste Charlois on March 5, 1891 while working at the Nice Observatory. Charlois named it after the Greek goddess of victory, as well as the Greek name for the city where it was discovered.[4] Measurement of the light curve of this asteroid in 2000 indicates a rotation period of 7.902 ± 0.005 hours.[2]

On December 2, 1972, Pioneer 10 made one of its nearest passages of an asteroid when it passed 307 Nike at a distance of about 8.8 million kilometers (0.059 AU) during the spacecraft's pioneering trip through the asteroid belt.[5][clarification needed Was any data collected?]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "307 Nike". JPL Small-Body Database. NASA/Jet Propulsion Laboratory. Retrieved 11 May 2016. 
  2. ^ a b Lazar, S.; Lazar, P., III; Cooney, W.; Wefel, K. (June 2001). "Lightcurves and Rotation Periods for Minor Planets (305) Gordonia (307) Nike, (337) Devosa, and (352) Gisela". The Minor Planet Bulletin. 28: 32–34. Bibcode:2001MPBu...28...32L. 
  3. ^ "Planetary Habitability Calculators". Planetary Habitability Laboratory. University of Puerto Rico at Arecibo. Retrieved 23 December 2015. 
  4. ^ Schmadel, Lutz D. (2003). Dictionary of minor planet names. Physics and astronomy online library. 1 (5th ed.). Springer. p. 41. ISBN 3-540-00238-3. 
  5. ^ Fimmel, Richard O.; van Allen, James; Burgess, Eric (1980). Pioneer: first to Jupiter, Saturn, and beyond. Washington D.C., USA: NASA Scientific and Technical Information Office. 

External links[edit]