311 Claudia

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311 Claudia
311Claudia (Lightcurve Inversion).png
A three-dimensional model of 311 Claudia based on its light curve.
Discovery
Discovered by Auguste Charlois
Discovery date 11 June 1891
Designations
Main belt (Koronis)
Orbital characteristics[1]
Epoch 31 July 2016 (JD 2457600.5)
Uncertainty parameter 0
Observation arc 113.31 yr (41387 d)
Aphelion 2.90489 AU (434.565 Gm)
Perihelion 2.89097 AU (432.483 Gm)
2.89793 AU (433.524 Gm)
Eccentricity 0.0024026
4.93 yr (1801.9 d)
17.5 km/s
260.154°
0° 11m 59.24s / day
Inclination 3.22695°
81.0114°
51.4007°
Earth MOID 1.88669 AU (282.245 Gm)
Jupiter MOID 2.05832 AU (307.920 Gm)
Jupiter Tisserand parameter 3.286
Physical characteristics
Dimensions 24.05±1.8 km
Mass unknown
Mean density
unknown
Equatorial surface gravity
unknown
Equatorial escape velocity
unknown
7.532 h (0.3138 d)
0.3381±0.057
Temperature unknown
unknown
10.0

311 Claudia is a typical Main belt asteroid.

It was discovered by Auguste Charlois on June 11, 1891 in Nice.[2] The name was suggested to Charlois by the amateur astronomer Arthur Mee of Cardiff, Wales, to commemorate Mee's wife, Claudia.[3]

311 Claudia is one of the Koronis family of asteroids. A group of astronomers, including Lucy D’Escoffier Crespo da Silva and Richard P. Binzel, used observations made between 1998 through 2000 to determine the spin-vector alignment of these asteroids. The collaborative work resulted in the creation of 61 new individual rotation lightcurves to augment previous published observations.[4]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "311 Claudia". JPL Small-Body Database. NASA/Jet Propulsion Laboratory. Retrieved 11 May 2016. 
  2. ^ Schmadel Lutz D. Dictionary of Minor Planet Names (fifth edition), Springer, 2003. ISBN 3-540-00238-3.
  3. ^ Mee, Arthur B. P. (2 April 1910), "Astronomical Notes", Weekly Mail, p. 11, retrieved 2013-08-25 
  4. ^ Slivan, S. M., Binzel, R. P., Crespo da Silva, L. D., Kaasalainen, M., Lyndaker, M. M., Krco, M.: “Spin vectors in the Koronis family: comprehensive results from two independent analyses of 213 rotation lightcurves,”Icarus, 162, 2003, pp. 285-307.

External links[edit]