31 Lyncis

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31 Lyncis
Observation data
Epoch J2000      Equinox J2000
Constellation Lynx
Right ascension 08h 22m 50.13s[1]
Declination +43° 11′ 18.1″[1]
Apparent magnitude (V) +4.25[2]
Characteristics
Astrometry
Radial velocity (Rv) 24.56 ± 0.22 km/s
Proper motion (μ) RA: –25.16 ± 0.36[1] mas/yr
Dec.: –99.23 ± 0.21[1] mas/yr
Parallax (π) 8.53 ± 0.25[1] mas
Distance 380 ± 10 ly
(117 ± 3 pc)
Details
Surface gravity (log g) 1.46 ± 0.12[3] cgs
Temperature 3921 ± 19[3] K
Metallicity [Fe/H] -0.06 ± 0.05[3] dex
Other designations
Alsciaukat, BD +43 1815, FK5 314, HR 3275, HD 70272, HIP 41075, SAO 42319, NSV 4030, GC 11401.

31 Lyncis, or Alsciaukat, is the fourth-brightest star in the constellation Lynx. It is an orange giant star located about 390 light years from Earth. Its apparent magnitude is +4.25 and it belongs to the spectral class K4.5III-IIIb.

A 1993 study found that it varied in brightness by 0.05 magnitude over 25 to 30 days.[4]

Analysis of HIPPARCOS data showed that it was slightly variable by 0.0055 magnitude.[5]

Names[edit]

This star has the traditional names Alsciaukat, from Arabic الشوكة aš-šawkat "the thorn", and Mabsuthat, from Arabic المبسوطة al-mabsūtah "the outstretched (paw)".

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e van Leeuwen, F. (2007). "Validation of the new Hipparcos reduction". Astronomy and Astrophysics. 474 (2): 653–664. arXiv:0708.1752free to read. Bibcode:2007A&A...474..653V. doi:10.1051/0004-6361:20078357. 
  2. ^ Ducati, J. R. (2002). "VizieR Online Data Catalog: Catalogue of Stellar Photometry in Johnson's 11-color system". CDS/ADC Collection of Electronic Catalogues. 2237. Bibcode:2002yCat.2237....0D. 
  3. ^ a b c Sharma, Kaushal; Prugniel, Philippe; Singh, Harinder P. (2016). "New atmospheric parameters and spectral interpolator for the MILES cool stars". Astronomy & Astrophysics. 585: 27. arXiv:1512.04882free to read. Bibcode:2016A&A...585A..64S. doi:10.1051/0004-6361/201526111. A64. 
  4. ^ Percy, John R. (1993). "The photometric variability of K giants". Publications of the Astronomical Society of the Pacific. 105 (694): 1422–26. Bibcode:1993PASP..105.1422P. doi:10.1086/133324. 
  5. ^ Koen, Chris; Eyer, Laurent (2002). "New periodic variables from the Hipparcos epoch photometry". Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society. 331: 45. arXiv:astro-ph/0112194free to read. Bibcode:2002MNRAS.331...45K. doi:10.1046/j.1365-8711.2002.05150.x. 

External links[edit]