3345 Tarkovskij

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3345 Tarkovskij
Discovery [1]
Discovered by L. G. Karachkina
Discovery site Crimean Astrophysical Obs.
Discovery date 23 December 1982
Designations
MPC designation (3345) Tarkovskij
Named after
Andrei Tarkovsky
(Soviet film-maker)[2]
1982 YC1 · 1938 QC
1952 BD2 · 1969 OB
main-belt · (inner)
Orbital characteristics[1]
Epoch 4 September 2017 (JD 2458000.5)
Uncertainty parameter 0
Observation arc 78.39 yr (28,633 days)
Aphelion 2.9425 AU
Perihelion 2.0032 AU
2.4729 AU
Eccentricity 0.1899
3.89 yr (1,420 days)
296.00°
0° 15m 12.6s / day
Inclination 15.850°
304.89°
194.43°
Physical characteristics
Dimensions 20.746±0.129 km[3]
24±2 km[4]
187±3 h[5][6]
0.029±0.002[3]
0.0688±0.015[4]
SMASS = C[1]
11.8[1]

3345 Tarkovskij, provisional designation 1982 YC1, is a carbonaceous asteroid and slow rotator from the inner regions of the asteroid belt, approximately 22 kilometers in diameter. It was discovered on 23 December 1982, by Russian astronomer Lyudmila Karachkina at the Crimean Astrophysical Observatory in Nauchnyj, on the Crimean peninsula, and named after film-director Andrei Tarkovsky.[2][7]

Orbit and classification[edit]

Tarkovskij orbits the Sun in the inner main-belt at a distance of 2.0–2.9 AU once every 3 years and 11 months (1,420 days). Its orbit has an eccentricity of 0.19 and an inclination of 16° with respect to the ecliptic.[1]

It was first identified as 1938 QC at Heidelberg Observatory in 1938, extending the body's observation arc by 44 years prior to its official discovery observation at Nauchnyj.[7]

Physical characteristics[edit]

In the SMASS classification, Tarkovskij is a carbonaceous C-type asteroid, unusual for inner-belt asteroids which are typically of a stony composition.[1]

Slow rotator[edit]

In January 2014, a rotational lightcurve of Tarkovskij was obtained from photometric observations taken at the Belgrade Observatory and the CS3 DanHenge Observatory (U80). Lightcurve analysis gave a rotation period of 187 hours with a brightness variation of 0.59 magnitude (U=3-).[5] This makes it a slow rotator, as most asteroids have periods shorter than 20 hours.

Diameter and albedo[edit]

According to the surveys carried out by the Infrared Astronomical Satellite IRAS, the Japanese Akari satellite, and NASA's Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer with its subsequent NEOWISE mission, Tarkovskij measures between 21.02 and 24.17 kilometers in diameter and its surface has an albedo between 0.0407 and 0.096.[6] The Collaborative Asteroid Lightcurve Link derives an albedo of 0.0526 and adopts a diameter of 24.17 kilometers with on an absolute magnitude of 11.9 from the IRAS results.[4][6]

Naming[edit]

This minor planet named after the Soviet theater director and film-maker Andrei Tarkovsky (1932—1986).[2] The approved naming citation was published by the Minor Planet Center on 31 May 1988 (M.P.C. 13176).[8]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f "JPL Small-Body Database Browser: 3345 Tarkovskij (1982 YC1)" (2017-01-09 last obs.). Jet Propulsion Laboratory. Retrieved 16 June 2017. 
  2. ^ a b c Schmadel, Lutz D. (2007). Dictionary of Minor Planet Names – (3345) Tarkovskij. Springer Berlin Heidelberg. p. 279. ISBN 978-3-540-00238-3. Retrieved 16 June 2017. 
  3. ^ a b Masiero, Joseph R.; Mainzer, A. K.; Grav, T.; Bauer, J. M.; Cutri, R. M.; Dailey, J.; et al. (November 2011). "Main Belt Asteroids with WISE/NEOWISE. I. Preliminary Albedos and Diameters". The Astrophysical Journal. 741 (2): 20. arXiv:1109.4096Freely accessible. Bibcode:2011ApJ...741...68M. doi:10.1088/0004-637X/741/2/68. Retrieved 16 June 2017. 
  4. ^ a b c Tedesco, E. F.; Noah, P. V.; Noah, M.; Price, S. D. (October 2004). "IRAS Minor Planet Survey V6.0". NASA Planetary Data System. Bibcode:2004PDSS...12.....T. Retrieved 16 June 2017. 
  5. ^ a b Benishek, Vladimir; Coley, Daniel R. (October 2014). "Rotation Period Determination for the Slow Rotator 3345 Tarkovskij". The Minor Planet Bulletin. 41 (4): 260–261. Bibcode:2014MPBu...41..260B. ISSN 1052-8091. Retrieved 16 June 2017. 
  6. ^ a b c "LCDB Data for (3345) Tarkovskij". Asteroid Lightcurve Database (LCDB). Retrieved 16 June 2017. 
  7. ^ a b "3345 Tarkovskij (1982 YC1)". Minor Planet Center. Retrieved 16 June 2017. 
  8. ^ "MPC/MPO/MPS Archive". Minor Planet Center. Retrieved 16 June 2017. 

External links[edit]