3360 Syrinx

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(3360) Syrinx
Discovery
Discovered by Eleanor F. Helin
R. Scott Dunbar
Discovery date 4 November 1981
Designations
MPC designation (3360) Syrinx
Named after
Syrinx
1981 VA
Apollo, Mars crosser, alinda family
Orbital characteristics[1]
Epoch 13 January 2016 (JD 2457400.5)
Uncertainty parameter 0
Observation arc 12556 days (34.38 yr)
Aphelion 4.30603 AU (644.173 Gm)
Perihelion 0.62791 AU (93.934 Gm)
2.46697 AU (369.053 Gm)
Eccentricity 0.74547
3.87 yr (1415.3 d)
15.981 km/s
315.35°
0° 15m 15.732s / day
Inclination 21.154°
242.561°
63.457°
Earth MOID 0.107877 AU (16.1382 Gm)
Jupiter MOID 1.77398 AU (265.384 Gm)
Jupiter Tisserand parameter 2.965
Physical characteristics
Dimensions 1.8 km
Mean radius
0.9 km
Mass ~8.4×1012 kg
Mean density
2.0? g/cm³
Equatorial surface gravity
~0.0006 m/s²
Equatorial escape velocity
~0.0011 km/s
? d
0.17
Temperature ~174 K
?
15.9

3360 Syrinx (originally designated 1981 VA) is an Apollo and Mars crosser asteroid discovered in 1981. It approaches Earth to within 40 Gm three times in the 21st century: 33 Gm in 2039, 40 Gm in 2070, and 24 Gm in 2085.

On 2012-Sep-20 it passed 0.4192 AU (62,710,000 km; 38,970,000 mi) from the Earth[1] at apparent magnitude 17.0.[2] In opposition on 23 Nov 2012, it brightened to magnitude 16.0.[2]

For a time, it was the lowest numbered asteroid that had not been named. Since November 2006, this distinction has been held by (3708) 1974 FV1.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "JPL Close-Approach Data: 3360 Syrinx (1981 VA)" (2009-01-22 last obs). Retrieved 14 April 2016. 
  2. ^ a b "NEODys (3360) Syrinx Ephemerides for 20 September 2012". Department of Mathematics, University of Pisa, Italy. Retrieved 2012-03-25. 
Sources