34 Circe

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34 Circe
34Circe (Lightcurve Inversion).png
A three-dimensional model of 34 Circe based on its light curve.
Discovery
Discovered by J. Chacornac
Discovery date April 6, 1855
Designations
Named after
Circe
1965 JL
Main belt
Orbital characteristics[1]
Epoch November 4, 2013 (JD 2456600.5)
Aphelion 2.967739 AU
Perihelion 2.406230 AU
2.686984 AU
Eccentricity 0.1045
4.40 a (1607.332 d)
18.12 km/s
39.80474°
Inclination 5.498°
184.44157°
330.2330°
Physical characteristics
Dimensions 113.02 ± 4.90 km[2]
Mass (3.66 ± 0.03) × 1018 kg[2]
Mean density
4.83 ± 0.63 g/cm3[2]
~0.0317 m/s²
~0.0600 km/s
0.5063 d (12.15 h) [1]
Albedo 0.0541 [1]
Temperature ~172 K
Spectral type
C
8.51

34 Circe (/ˈsɜːrs/ SUR-see) is a large, very dark main-belt asteroid. It was discovered by French astronomer J. Chacornac on April 6, 1855, and named after Circe, a goddess in Greek mythology.

Photometric observations of this asteroid made during 2007 at the Organ Mesa Observatory in Las Cruces, New Mexico gave an asymmetrical bimodal light curve with a period of 12.176 ± 0.002 hours and a brightness variation of 0.17 ± 0.02 in magnitude.[3]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c Yeomans, Donald K., "34 Circe", JPL Small-Body Database Browser, NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory, retrieved 2013-12-21. 
  2. ^ a b c Carry, B. (December 2012), "Density of asteroids", Planetary and Space Science, 73, pp. 98–118, arXiv:1203.4336free to read, Bibcode:2012P&SS...73...98C, doi:10.1016/j.pss.2012.03.009.  See Table 1.
  3. ^ Pilcher, Frederick (September 2008), "Period Determinations for 26 Proserpina, 34 Circe 74 Galatea, 143 Adria, 272 Antonia, 419 Aurelia, and 557 Violetta", The Minor Planet Bulletin, 35 (3), pp. 135–138, Bibcode:2008MPBu...35..135P. 

External links[edit]