3554 Amun

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3554 Amun
Amun Sept 9 2012.PNG
Orbit diagram of asteroid Amun with location as of September 9, 2012
Discovery
Discovered by C. Shoemaker
E. M. Shoemaker
Discovery date 4 March 1986
Designations
MPC designation (3554) Amun
Named after
Amun
1986 EB
Aten[1]
Venus-crosser asteroid
Orbital characteristics[1]
Epoch 13 January 2016 (JD 2457400.5)
Uncertainty parameter 0
Observation arc 10923 days (29.91 yr)
Aphelion 1.24677 AU (186.514 Gm)
Perihelion 0.700578 AU (104.8050 Gm)
0.973675 AU (145.6597 Gm)
Eccentricity 0.28048
0.96 yr (350.9 d)
184.781°
1.02585°/day
Inclination 23.3626°
358.627°
359.392°
Earth MOID 0.250204 AU (37.4300 Gm)
Physical characteristics
Dimensions 2.48 km[1]
Mass ~1.6×1013 kg
2.53001 h (0.105417 d)[1]
0.1284 ± 0.024[1]
M-type asteroid
15.82[1]

3554 Amun is an M-type Aten asteroid (meaning it crosses Earth's orbit) and a Venus-crosser. It was discovered on 4 March 1986 by Carolyn and Eugene Shoemaker at Mount Palomar Observatory. Its estimated diameter is 2.48 kilometers, making it one of the smallest known M-type asteroids. Amun was the fifth Aten asteroid to be numbered.

Amun was once considered metallic, based on its M-type spectrum. In Mining the Sky, planetary scientist John S. Lewis calculated the value of 3554 Amun at $20 trillion.[2]

(6178) 1986 DA is another M-type near-Earth asteroid with lower inclination that is actually metallic.

Amun passes closest to Venus, and in 1964, 2034, and 2103 comes within 10 Gm of it.[1]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f g "JPL Small-Body Database Browser: 3554 Amun (1986 EB)" (2014-02-19 last obs (arc=27.9 yr)). Jet Propulsion Laboratory. Retrieved 11 April 2016.
  2. ^ "NSS Review: Mining the Sky". www.nss.org. Retrieved 2018-02-26.

External links[edit]