365 BC

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Millennium: 1st millennium BC
Centuries:
Decades:
Years:
365 BC in various calendars
Gregorian calendar 365 BC
CCCLXIV BC
Ab urbe condita 389
Ancient Egypt era XXX dynasty, 16
- Pharaoh Nectanebo I, 16
Ancient Greek era 103rd Olympiad, year 4
Assyrian calendar 4386
Balinese saka calendar N/A
Bengali calendar −957
Berber calendar 586
Buddhist calendar 180
Burmese calendar −1002
Byzantine calendar 5144–5145
Chinese calendar 乙卯(Wood Rabbit)
2332 or 2272
    — to —
丙辰年 (Fire Dragon)
2333 or 2273
Coptic calendar −648 – −647
Discordian calendar 802
Ethiopian calendar −372 – −371
Hebrew calendar 3396–3397
Hindu calendars
 - Vikram Samvat −308 – −307
 - Shaka Samvat N/A
 - Kali Yuga 2736–2737
Holocene calendar 9636
Iranian calendar 986 BP – 985 BP
Islamic calendar 1016 BH – 1015 BH
Javanese calendar N/A
Julian calendar N/A
Korean calendar 1969
Minguo calendar 2276 before ROC
民前2276年
Nanakshahi calendar −1832
Thai solar calendar 178–179
Tibetan calendar 阴木兔年
(female Wood-Rabbit)
−238 or −619 or −1391
    — to —
阳火龙年
(male Fire-Dragon)
−237 or −618 or −1390

Year 365 BC was a year of the pre-Julian Roman calendar. At the time, it was known as the Year of the Consulship of Aventinensis and Ahala (or, less frequently, year 389 Ab urbe condita). The denomination 365 BC for this year has been used since the early medieval period, when the Anno Domini calendar era became the prevalent method in Europe for naming years.

Events[edit]

By place[edit]

Greece[edit]

Roman Republic[edit]

  • Etruscan actors stage the first theatrical performances in Rome.


Births[edit]

Deaths[edit]

References[edit]