3749 Balam

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3749 Balam
Discovery [1]
Discovered by E. Bowell
Discovery site Anderson Mesa Station
Discovery date 24 January 1982
Designations
MPC designation 3749 Balam
Named after
David Balam
(astronomer)[2]
1982 BG1 · 1954 XM
1962 ED · 1974 YO
main-belt · Flora[3]
Orbital characteristics[1]
Epoch 13 January 2016 (JD 2457400.5)
Uncertainty parameter 0
Observation arc 22383 days (61.28 yr)
Aphelion 2.4822 AU (371.33 Gm)
Perihelion 1.9916 AU (297.94 Gm)
2.2369 AU (334.64 Gm)
Eccentricity 0.10966
3.35 yr (1222.0 d)
77.251°
0° 17m 40.596s / day
Inclination 5.3806°
295.72°
173.90°
Known satellites 2 satellites
5.2±1 km, 1.5 km
Earth MOID 1.00818 AU (150.822 Gm)
Jupiter MOID 2.61697 AU (391.493 Gm)
Jupiter Tisserand parameter 3.624
Physical characteristics
Dimensions 7.2 km[4]
4.7±0.5 km[5]
6.36 km (calculated)[3]
Mass (5.09±0.2)×1014 kg[4][6]
Mean density
2.61±0.45 g/cm³[4][6]
2.80483 h (0.116868 d)[7]
2.80490±0.00008 h[8]
2.80478±0.00005 h[a]
2.80494±0.00007 h[9]
0.16[10]
0.3546±0.0671[11]
0.277±0.096[5]
0.15 (assumed)[3]
S[3][10]
13.3

3749 Balam, provisionally known as 1982 BG1, is a trinary asteroid orbiting the inner regions of asteroid belt, about 7 kilometers in diameter. It was discovered by American astronomer Edward Bowell at Lowell's Anderson Mesa Station near Flagstaff, Arizona on 24 January 1982.[12]

The asteroid is a member of the Flora family, a very large group of stony asteroids in the inner main-belt. It orbits the Sun at a distance of 2.0–2.5 AU once every 3 years and 4 months (1,222 days). Its orbit shows an eccentricity of 0.11 and is tilted by 5 degrees to the plane of the ecliptic. The S-type asteroid has an albedo of 0.16.[10] The body's rotation around its axis has been measured several times by different light-curve observations with a concurring period of 2.8 hours.[7][8][9][a]

It is named after the Canadian astronomer David Balam, principal observer at Victoria's Climenhaga Observatory in British Columbia.[2]

Satellite system[edit]

On February 13, 2002, the discovery of a satellite with a diameter of approximately 1.5 kilometers, designated S/2002 (3749) 1, was announced by a team of researchers from SwRI, UA, JPL and OSUG, using the Gemini North Telescope on Mauna Kea in Hawaii.[13] It orbits 289±13 km away in 61±10 days, with an orbital eccentricity of ~ 0.9.[6]

Being such a small primary body in the inner main belt with a separation of over 100 primary radii, S/2002 (3749) 1 is the most loosely bound binary known.[14] Balam has a Hill sphere with a radius of about 1,500 kilometers.[6]

In March 2008, Franck Marchis discovered a larger (~3 km) inner companion, making this a triple system.[15][16][17]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Pravec-2012web, rotation period of 2.80478±0.00005 with an amplitude in brightness variation of 0.1 magnitude. Summary figures at Lightcurve Database for (3749) Balam
  1. ^ a b "JPL Small-Body Database Browser: 3749 Balam (1982 BG1)" (2015-03-29 last obs.). Jet Propulsion Laboratory. Retrieved 14 April 2016. 
  2. ^ a b Schmadel, Lutz D. (2003). Dictionary of Minor Planet Names – (3749) Balam. Springer Berlin Heidelberg. p. 317. ISBN 978-3-540-29925-7. Retrieved 11 November 2015. 
  3. ^ a b c d "LCDB Data for (3749) Balam". Asteroid Lightcurve Database (LCDB). Retrieved 11 November 2015. 
  4. ^ a b c Jim Baer (12 December 2010). "Recent Asteroid Mass Determinations". Personal Website. Retrieved 3 February 2012. 
  5. ^ a b Marchis, F.; Enriquez, J. E.; Emery, J. P.; Mueller, M.; Baek, M.; Pollock, J.; et al. (November 2012). "Multiple asteroid systems: Dimensions and thermal properties from Spitzer Space Telescope and ground-based observations". Icarus. 221 (2): 1130–1161. arXiv:1604.05384Freely accessible. Bibcode:2012Icar..221.1130M. doi:10.1016/j.icarus.2012.09.013. Retrieved 11 November 2015. 
  6. ^ a b c d Marchis, Franck; P. Descamps; J. Berthier; D. Hestroffer; F. Vachier; M. Baek; et al. (2008). "Main Belt Binary Asteroidal Systems With Eccentric Mutual Orbits". Icarus. 195 (1): 295–316. arXiv:0804.1385Freely accessible. Bibcode:2008Icar..195..295M. doi:10.1016/j.icarus.2007.12.010. 
  7. ^ a b Marchis, F.; Pollock, J.; Pravec, P.; Baek, M.; Greene, J.; Hutton, L.; et al. (March 2008). "(3749) Balam". Central Bureau Electronic Telegrams. Bibcode:2008CBET.1297....1M. Retrieved 11 November 2015. 
  8. ^ a b Polishook, D.; Brosch, N.; Prialnik, D. (March 2011). "Rotation periods of binary asteroids with large separations - Confronting the Escaping Ejecta Binaries model with observations". Icarus. 212 (1): 167–174. arXiv:1012.4810Freely accessible. Bibcode:2011Icar..212..167P. doi:10.1016/j.icarus.2010.12.020. Retrieved 11 November 2015. 
  9. ^ a b Polishook, D. (October 2014). "Spin axes and shape models of asteroid pairs: Fingerprints of YORP and a path to the density of rubble piles". Icarus. 241: 79–96. arXiv:1406.3359Freely accessible. Bibcode:2014Icar..241...79P. doi:10.1016/j.icarus.2014.06.018. Retrieved 11 November 2015. 
  10. ^ a b c Thomas Wm Hamilton. "Dwarf Planets and Asteroids: Minor Bodies of the Solar System". 
  11. ^ Mainzer, A.; Grav, T.; Masiero, J.; Hand, E.; Bauer, J.; Tholen, D.; et al. (November 2011). "NEOWISE Studies of Spectrophotometrically Classified Asteroids: Preliminary Results". The Astrophysical Journal. 741 (2): 25. arXiv:1109.6407Freely accessible. Bibcode:2011ApJ...741...90M. doi:10.1088/0004-637X/741/2/90. Retrieved 11 November 2015. 
  12. ^ "3749 Balam (1982 BG1)". Minor Planet Center. Retrieved 11 November 2015. 
  13. ^ "IAUC 7827: P/2001 WF_2; S/2002 (3749) 1". IAU Central Bureau for Astronomical Telegrams. 2002-02-13. Retrieved 17 November 2005. 
  14. ^ Merline, W.J.; Siegler, N.; Dumas, C.; Chapman, C. R.; Rigaut, F.; Menard, F.; et al. (2002). "Discovery of a Loosely-bound Companion to Main-belt Asteroid (3749) Balam". American Astronomical Society. 34: 835. Bibcode:2002DPS....34.0201M. 
  15. ^ "IAUC 8928: V2468 Cyg = N Cyg 2008; (3749)". IAU Central Bureau for Astronomical Telegrams. 2008-03-19. Retrieved 4 February 2012. 
  16. ^ Franck Marchis (Principal Investigator, SETI Institute, UC Berkeley). "Franck Marchis Web Page". Department of Astronomy (University of California at Berkeley). Retrieved 2009-10-27. 
  17. ^ Wm. Robert Johnston (2009-01-13). "(3749) Balam, S/2002 (3749) 1, and third component". Johnston's Archive. Retrieved 27 October 2009. 

External links[edit]