379 Huenna

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379 Huenna
Discovery[1]
Discovered by Auguste Charlois
Discovery date 8 January 1894
Designations
Named after
Ven
1894 AQ; A895 DB; A911 BA; 1948 XM
Main belt (Themis)
Orbital characteristics[1]
Epoch 31 July 2016 (JD 2457600.5)
Uncertainty parameter 0
Observation arc 122.26 yr (44656 d)
Aphelion 3.7186 AU (556.29 Gm)
Perihelion 2.5540 AU (382.07 Gm)
3.1363 AU (469.18 Gm)
Eccentricity 0.18567
5.55 yr (2028.7 d)
16.68 km/s
126.109°
0° 10m 38.82s / day
Inclination 1.6699°
172.036°
179.961°
Known satellites 1 (5.8±1.2 km)[2]
Earth MOID 1.54752 AU (231.506 Gm)
Jupiter MOID 1.71074 AU (255.923 Gm)
Jupiter Tisserand parameter 3.184
Physical characteristics
Dimensions 92.33±1.7 km (IRAS)[1]
98±3 km[2]
Mass 3.83±0.19×1017 kg[2][3]
Mean density
0.9±0.1 g/cm³[2][3]
1.2 g/cm³[4][5]
Equatorial surface gravity
0.0150 m/s²
Equatorial escape velocity
0.0372 km/s
14.141 h (0.5892 d)[1]
0.0587±0.002[1]
Temperature ~159 K
C[3]
8.87[1]

379 Huenna is a large asteroid orbiting in the asteroid belt. It is part of the Themis family, and thus a C-type asteroid and consequently composed mainly of carbonaceous material.

It was discovered by Auguste Charlois on January 8, 1894 in Nice. It is named after the Swedish island of Hven, the site of two observatories.

A satellite, 7 km across and designated S/2003 (379) 1, was discovered on August 14, 2003 by Jean-Luc Margot using the Keck II adaptive optics telescope at Mauna Kea.[6] The moon orbits 3400±11 km away in 80.8±0.36 d with an eccentricity of 0.334±0.075.[5] The system is loosely bound[4] as Huenna has a hill sphere with a radius of about 20,000 km.[2]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f "JPL Small-Body Database Browser: 379 Huenna (1894 AQ)". Jet Propulsion Laboratory. 2012-01-03 last obs. Retrieved 10 May 2016. 
  2. ^ a b c d e Marchis, Franck; P. Descamps; J. Berthier; D. hestroffer; F. vachier; M. Baek; et al. (2008). "Main Belt Binary Asteroidal Systems With Eccentric Mutual Orbits". Icarus. 195 (1): 295–316. arXiv:0804.1385free to read. Bibcode:2008Icar..195..295M. doi:10.1016/j.icarus.2007.12.010. 
  3. ^ a b c Jim Baer (12 December 2010). "Recent Asteroid Mass Determinations". Personal Website. Retrieved 2012-02-03. 
  4. ^ a b Franck Marchis (May 2005). "379 Huenna and S/2003 (379) 1". UCB. Retrieved 2012-02-03. 
  5. ^ a b Wm. Robert Johnston (25 November 2008). "(379) Huenna and S/2003 (379) 1". Johnston's Archive. Archived from the original on 11 December 2005. Retrieved 2005-11-11. 
  6. ^ "IAUC 8182: S/2003 (379) 1; 2003he, 2003hf; C/2003 H1; C/2001 Q4". IAU Central Bureau for Astronomical Telegrams. 2003-08-15. Retrieved 2012-02-04. 

External links[edit]