38 Leda

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For other uses of "Leda", see Leda.
38 Leda
38Leda (Lightcurve Inversion).png
A three-dimensional model of 38 Leda based on its light curve.
Discovery
Discovered by J. Chacornac
Discovery date January 12, 1856
Designations
MPC designation (38) Leda
Named after
Leda
A904 SF; 1949 QO2
Main belt
Orbital characteristics
Epoch December 31, 2006 (JD 2454100.5)
Aphelion 472.587 Gm (3.159 AU)
Perihelion 348.232 Gm (2.328 AU)
410.409 Gm (2.743 AU)
Eccentricity 0.152
1659.725 d (4.54 a)
17.88 km/s
107.567°
Inclination 6.955°
295.890°
168.804°
Physical characteristics
Dimensions 115.41 ± 1.33 km[1]
Mass (5.71 ± 5.47) × 1018 kg[1]
Mean density
7.09 ± 6.79 g/cm3[1]
0.0324 m/s²
0.0613 km/s
0.5350 d (12.84 h) [2]
Albedo 0.0618 [2]
Temperature ~170 K
Spectral type
C[2]
8.32

38 Leda /ˈldə/ is a large, dark main-belt asteroid that was discovered by French astronomer J. Chacornac on January 12, 1856, and named after Leda, the mother of Helen of Troy in Greek mythology. In the Tholen classification system, it is categorized as a carbonaceous C-type asteroid, while the Bus asteroid taxonomy system lists it as a Cgh asteroid.[3]

Leda has been studied by radar.[4] During 2002, 38 Leda was observed by radar from the Arecibo Observatory. The return signal matched an effective diameter of 116 ± 13 km. This is consistent with the asteroid dimensions computed through other means.[5] Based upon a light curve that was generated from photometric observations of this asteroid at Pulkovo Observatory, it has a rotation period of 12.834 ± 0.001 hours and varies in brightness by 0.15 ± 0.01 in magnitude.[6]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c Carry, B. (December 2012), "Density of asteroids", Planetary and Space Science, 73, pp. 98–118, arXiv:1203.4336Freely accessible, Bibcode:2012P&SS...73...98C, doi:10.1016/j.pss.2012.03.009.  See Table 1.
  2. ^ a b c "38 Leda". JPL Small-Body Database. Jet Propulsion Laboratory. SPK-ID: 38. Retrieved 2008-06-15. 
  3. ^ DeMeo, Francesca E.; et al. (2011), "An extension of the Bus asteroid taxonomy into the near-infrared" (PDF), Icarus, 202 (1): 160–180, Bibcode:2009Icar..202..160D, doi:10.1016/j.icarus.2009.02.005, archived from the original (PDF) on 2014-03-17, retrieved 2013-04-12.  See appendix A.
  4. ^ "Radar-Detected Asteroids and Comets". NASA/JPL Asteroid Radar Research. Retrieved 2011-10-30. 
  5. ^ Magri, Christopher; et al. (January 2007), "A radar survey of main-belt asteroids: Arecibo observations of 55 objects during 1999–2003", Icarus, 186 (1): 126–151, Bibcode:2007Icar..186..126M, doi:10.1016/j.icarus.2006.08.018 
  6. ^ Pilcher, Frederick (October 2011), "Rotation Period Determinations for 11 Parthenope, 38 Leda, 111 Ate 194 Prokne, 217 Eudora, and 224 Oceana", The Minor Planet Bulletin, 38 (4), pp. 183–185, Bibcode:2011MPBu...38..183P. 

External links[edit]