390 Alma

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390 Alma
390Alma (Lightcurve Inversion).png
A three-dimensional model of 390 Alma based on its light curve.
Discovery
Discovered by Guillaume Bigourdan
Discovery date 24 March 1894
Designations
Named after
Alma River
1894 BC; 1930 QW;
1950 BV; 1950 CH;
1953 YB; 1963 DF
Main belt (Eunomia family)
Orbital characteristics[1]
Epoch 31 July 2016 (JD 2457600.5)
Uncertainty parameter 0
Observation arc 122.02 yr (44568 d)
Aphelion 3.00211 AU (449.109 Gm)
Perihelion 2.29906 AU (343.934 Gm)
2.65059 AU (396.523 Gm)
Eccentricity 0.13262
4.32 yr (1576.2 d)
18.21 km/s
136.953°
0° 13m 42.229s / day
Inclination 12.1645°
305.223°
190.194°
Earth MOID 1.31305 AU (196.429 Gm)
Jupiter MOID 2.06833 AU (309.418 Gm)
Jupiter Tisserand parameter 3.346
Physical characteristics
Dimensions 23.74±1.4 km[1]
24 km[2]
Mass ~2×1016 kg (estimate)
Mean density
~2.7 g/cm³ (estimate)[3]
Equatorial surface gravity
~0.009 m/s² (estimate)
Equatorial escape velocity
~0.015 km/s (estimate)
3.74 h (0.156 d)[1]
0.156 d[4]
0.2190±0.029
Temperature ~165 K
max: 250 K (-23 °C)
S-type asteroid
10.39

390 Alma is a typical medium-sized Eunomian asteroid.[citation needed][original research?] It was Guillaume Bigourdan's only asteroid discovery. He discovered it on March 24, 1894 in Paris.

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c "390 Alma (1894 BC)". JPL Small-Body Database. NASA/Jet Propulsion Laboratory. Retrieved 10 May 2016. 
  2. ^ "Supplemental IRAS Minor Planet Survey". 
  3. ^ G. A. Krasinsky; et al. (2002). "Hidden Mass in the Asteroid Belt". Icarus 158: 98. 
  4. ^ "PDS lightcurve data". 

External links[edit]