393 Lampetia

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393 Lampetia
Discovery
Discovered by Max Wolf
Discovery date 4 November 1894
Designations
Named after
Lampetia
1894 BG
Main belt
Orbital characteristics[1]
Epoch 31 July 2016 (JD 2457600.5)
Uncertainty parameter 0
Observation arc 112.56 yr (41112 d)
Aphelion 3.6980 AU (553.21 Gm)
Perihelion 1.8568 AU (277.77 Gm)
2.7774 AU (415.49 Gm)
Eccentricity 0.33146
4.63 yr (1690.6 d)
(4.63 yr)
17.87 km/s
173.245°
0° 12m 46.584s / day
Inclination 14.879°
212.460°
90.824°
Earth MOID 0.913163 AU (136.6072 Gm)
Jupiter MOID 1.90963 AU (285.677 Gm)
Jupiter Tisserand parameter 3.206
Physical characteristics
Dimensions 96.89±31.4 km
38.7 h (1.61 d)[1][2]
0.0829±0.099
8.39

393 Lampetia is a fairly large main belt asteroid that was discovered by German astronomer Max Wolf on November 4, 1894 in Heidelberg. It has an unusually low rotation rate, with a period estimated at 38.7 hours and a brightness variation of 0.14 in magnitude.[2]

In 2000, the asteroid was detected by radar from the Arecibo Observatory at a distance of 0.98 AU. The resulting data yielded an effective diameter of 125 ± 20 km.[3]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Yeomans, Donald K., "393 Lampetia", JPL Small-Body Database Browser, NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory, retrieved 10 May 2016. 
  2. ^ a b Scaltriti, F.; Zappala, V.; Schober, H. J. (January 1979), "The rotations of 128 Nemesis and 393 Lampetia - The longest known periods to date", Icarus, 37, pp. 133–141, Bibcode:1979Icar...37..133S, doi:10.1016/0019-1035(79)90121-0. 
  3. ^ Magri, Christopher; et al. (January 2007), "A radar survey of main-belt asteroids: Arecibo observations of 55 objects during 1999 2003" (PDF), Icarus, 186 (1): 126–151, Bibcode:2007Icar..186..126M, doi:10.1016/j.icarus.2006.08.018, retrieved 2015-04-14. 

External links[edit]