4-millimeter band

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The 4 millimeter band is a portion of the EHF (microwave) radio spectrum internationally allocated to amateur radio and amateur satellite use. The band is between 75.5 GHz and 81.5 GHz, with some regional and national variations.[1][2]

Due to the lack of commercial off the shelf radios, amateurs who operate on the 4 mm band must design and construct their own equipment. Amateurs often use the band to experiment with the maximum communication distance they can achieve, and they also use it occasionally for radio contesting.

Amateur radio shares the band with radio astronomy, vehicular radars for adaptive cruise control, and aircraft FOD detection radars.

Allocation[edit]

The International Telecommunication Union allocates 76.0 GHz to 81.0 GHz to amateur radio, amateur satellites, radio astronomy and radiolocation (radar) and space research downlinks. Amateurs operate on a primary basis between 77.5 GHz and 78.0 GHz and on a secondary basis in the rest of the band. Also, 81.0 GHz to 81.5 GHz is allocated by ITU footnote 5.561A to the amateur and amateur-satellite services on a secondary basis. The ITU's allocations are the same in all three ITU regions.[1]

Until 2006, 75.5 GHz to 76.0 GHz was also allocated by the ITU to amateurs on a primary basis. In response to this change, CEPT added footnote EU35 to the "European Common Allocation Table", which provides a continued allocation of this segment to European amateurs.[2]

List of notable frequencies[edit]

  • 75,976.200 MHz Preferred narrow band calling frequency in CEPT countries[3]
  • 76,032.200 MHz Narrow band calling frequency in some countries[3][4]
  • 77,500.200 MHz Preferred narrow band calling frequency, outside the CEPT area[3][4]

Distance records[edit]

The current world distance record on the 4 mm band was 289 kilometres (180 mi) set by US stations AD6IW and KF6KVG / K6GZA on June 14, 2014.[5][6]

The longest distance achieved on 4 mm in the United Kingdom was 129 kilometres (80 mi) between stations G8KQW and G8CUB on November 23, 2013.[6]

In Australia, the 4 mm distance record was 170.1 kilometres (105.7 mi) set by stations VK4FB and VK4CSD on July 18, 2019.[7]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "FCC Online Table of Frequency Allocations" (PDF). 47 C.F.R. Federal Communications Commission. May 7, 2019. Retrieved August 7, 2019.
  2. ^ a b Blondeel Timmerman, Hans (15 March 2009). "75.5-81.5 GHz". International Amateur Radio Union Region 1 Homepage. International Amateur Radio Union Region 1. Retrieved August 4, 2011. EU35: The band 75.5-76 GHz is in Europe also allocated to the Amateur and Amateur Satellite services
  3. ^ a b c "VHF Managers Handbook" (PDF). 7. International Amateur Radio Union Region 1. January 2015. p. 53. Retrieved October 27, 2015.
  4. ^ a b "IARU Region 2 Band Plan" (PDF). International Amateur Radio Union Region 2. October 14, 2016. p. 15.
  5. ^ "Distance Records" (PDF). Amateur Radio Relay League. May 21, 2019. Retrieved August 7, 2019.
  6. ^ a b Day, Peter; Qaurmby, John (May 9, 2019). "Microwave Distance Records". UK Microwave Group. Retrieved August 7, 2019.
  7. ^ "Australian VHF - UHF Records" (PDF). Wireless Institute of Australia. August 1, 2019. Retrieved August 7, 2019.

External links[edit]

Range Band ITU Region 1 ITU Region 2 ITU Region 3
LF 2200 m 135.7 kHz – 137.8 kHz
MF 630 m 472 kHz – 479 kHz
160 m 1.810 MHz – 1.850 MHz 1.800 MHz – 2.000 MHz
HF 80 / 75 m 3.500 MHz – 3.800 MHz 3.500 MHz – 4.000 MHz 3.500 MHz – 3.900 MHz
60 m 5.3515 MHz – 5.3665 MHz
40 m 7.000 MHz – 7.200 MHz 7.000 MHz – 7.300 MHz 7.000 MHz – 7.200 MHz
30 m[w] 10.100 MHz – 10.150 MHz
20 m 14.000 MHz – 14.350 MHz
17 m[w] 18.068 MHz – 18.168 MHz
15 m 21.000 MHz – 21.450 MHz
12 m[w] 24.890 MHz – 24.990 MHz
10 m 28.000 MHz – 29.700 MHz
VHF 6 m 50.000 MHz – 52.000 MHz[x] 50.000 MHz – 54.000 MHz
4 m[x] 70.000 MHz – 70.500 MHz N/A
2 m 144.000 MHz – 146.000 MHz 144.000 MHz – 148.000 MHz
1.25 m N/A 220.000 MHz – 225.000 MHz N/A
UHF 70 cm 430.000 MHz – 440.000 MHz 430.000 MHz – 440.000 MHz
(420.000 MHz – 450.000 MHz)[y]
33 cm N/A 902.000 MHz – 928.000 MHz N/A
23 cm 1.240 GHz – 1.300 GHz
13 cm 2.300 GHz – 2.450 GHz
SHF 9 cm 3.400 GHz – 3.475 GHz[y] 3.300 GHz – 3.500 GHz
5 cm 5.650 GHz – 5.850 GHz 5.650 GHz – 5.925 GHz 5.650 GHz – 5.850 GHz
3 cm 10.000 GHz – 10.500 GHz
1.2 cm 24.000 GHz – 24.250 GHz
EHF 6 mm 47.000 GHz – 47.200 GHz
4 mm[y] 75.500 GHz[x] – 81.500 GHz 76.000 GHz – 81.500 GHz
2.5 mm 122.250 GHz – 123.000 GHz
2 mm 134.000 GHz – 141.000 GHz
1 mm 241.000 GHz – 250.000 GHz
THF Sub-mm Some administrations have authorized spectrum for amateur use in this region;
others have declined to regulate frequencies above 300 GHz, leaving them available by default.

[w] HF allocation created at the 1979 World Administrative Radio Conference. These are commonly called the "WARC bands".
[x] This is not mentioned in the ITU's Table of Frequency Allocations, but individual administrations may make allocations under "Article 4.4". ITU Radio Regulations.. See the appropriate Wiki page for further information.
[y] This includes a currently active footnote allocation mentioned in the ITU's Table of Frequency Allocations. These allocations may only apply to a group of countries.

See also: Radio spectrum, Electromagnetic spectrum