400s (decade)

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Millennium: 1st millennium
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The 400s decade ran from January 1, 400, to December 31, 409.

Events[edit]

400

By place[edit]

Roman Empire[edit]
Europe[edit]
Asia[edit]

By topic[edit]

Art[edit]
Literature[edit]
Medicine[edit]
Physics[edit]
Religion[edit]

401[edit]

By place[edit]

Roman Empire[edit]
  • Emperor Arcadius sends many gifts to the Hunnish chieftain Uldin, in appreciation of his victory over the Goths and Gainas. Arcadius then allies himself with the Huns.
  • Piracy is committed by slave-traders from Galatia (Turkey), along the coasts of Africa. The old Legio II Adiutrix, part of which had always been stationed at Aquincum (modern Budapest), is divided into two comitatenses and shipped to Britannia.
  • Stilicho, Roman general (magister militum), leads his army in an extensive campaign against the Vandals in Rhaetia (Switzerland).
  • The Temple of Artemis near Selçuk in Ephesus is dismantled.
  • November 18 – The Visigoths, led by king Alaric I, cross the Alps and invade northern Italy.
  • Emperor Honorius begins to use the city of Ravenna as a temporary center for certain administrative and military functions. The city is chosen because of its proximity to the bulk of the Western Roman army and due to the fact that its relative poverty makes it a less tempting target for barbarian invaders than cities such as Rome or Milan. This event is often misinterpreted as the establishment of Ravenna as a capital. In reality, the capital of the Western Roman Empire was not truly established at Ravenna until 408.[3]
Black Sea[edit]
China[edit]

By topic[edit]

Religion[edit]

402[edit]

By place[edit]

Roman Empire[edit]
Asia[edit]

By topic[edit]

Religion[edit]

403[edit]

By place[edit]

Roman Empire[edit]
Asia[edit]

By topic[edit]

Religion[edit]

404[edit]

By place[edit]

Roman Empire[edit]
  • January 1 – Last known gladiator fight in Rome: This date is usually given as the date of the martyrdom of Saint Telemachus, a Christian monk who was stoned by the crowd for trying to stop a gladiators' fight in a Roman amphitheatre.
  • October 6 – Empress Eudoxia has her seventh and last pregnancy, which ends in a miscarriage. She is left bleeding and dies of an infection short after.
  • Fravitta, a Goth serving the Eastern Roman Empire as a high-ranking general, is executed on the behest of a powerful official named Ioannes. Fravitta is executed because he accused Ioannes of pitting Emperor Arcadius and Emperor Honorius (of the Eastern and Western Roman Empires, respectively) against each other. The execution of Fravitta results in the Eastern Roman Empire losing one of their most loyal and competent generals.[6] (404 or 405)
Asia[edit]
  • Gwanggaeto the Great of Goguryeo (Korea) attacks Liaodong and takes the entire Liaodong Peninsula.
  • The Chinese Buddhist monk Huiyuan, who founded the Pure Land Buddhism sect and the monastery on Mount Lushan, writes the book On Why Monks Do Not Bow Down Before Kings in this year. In his book he argues that although the Buddhist clergy should remain independent and undisturbed by politics, the Buddhist laymen nonetheless make good subjects under monarchs, due to their fear of retribution of karma and desire to be reborn in paradise.

By topic[edit]

Religion[edit]

405[edit]

By place[edit]

Roman Empire[edit]
Asia[edit]
  • The Khitan are first mentioned in Chinese chronicles. They wander along the boundaries of Kara-muren, and form part of the Donghu (Tong-hou) confederation.
  • Jeonji becomes king of the Korean kingdom of Baekje.[7]

By topic[edit]

Arts and Sciences[edit]
Religion[edit]

406[edit]

By place[edit]

Roman Empire[edit]
  • Radagaisus is forced to retreat into the hills of Fiesole. There he tries to escape, but is captured by the Romans.
Defeat of Radagaisus at Fiesole
Asia[edit]

By topic[edit]

Agriculture[edit]
Religion[edit]

407[edit]

By place[edit]

Roman Empire[edit]

408[edit]

By place[edit]

Roman Empire[edit]
Persia[edit]
  • King Yazdegerd I of Persia maintains cordial relations with the Roman Empire. He becomes an executor of Arcadius' will and is entrusted with the care of the young Theodosius II until he comes of age.

By topic[edit]

Medicine[edit]
  • Alaric I exacts a tribute from Rome that includes 3,000 pounds of pepper. The spice is valued for alleged medicinal virtues and for disguising spoilage in meat that is past its prime.

409[edit]

By place[edit]

Roman Empire[edit]
Asia[edit]

Significant people[edit]

Births[edit]

400

401

403

405

406

407

408

409

Deaths[edit]

400

401

402

403

404

405

406

407

408

409


References[edit]

  1. ^ The End of Empire (p. 76). Christopher Kelly, 2009. ISBN 978-0-393-33849-2
  2. ^ Maas, Philipp André (2004). Samādhipāda das erste Kapitel des Pātañjalayogaśāstra zum ersten Mal kritisch ediert. Aachen: Shaker. ISBN 3832249877.
  3. ^ Gillett, Andrew (2001). "Rome, Ravenna and the Last Western Emperors". Papers of the British School at Rome. 69: 131–167. doi:10.1017/S0068246200001781. ISSN 0068-2462. JSTOR 40311008.
  4. ^ Yanko-Hombach, Valentina; Gilbert, Allan S.; Panin, Nicolae; Dolukhanov, Pavel M. (2006). The Black Sea Flood Question: Changes in Coastline, Climate and Human Settlement. Springer Science & Business Media. p. 635. ISBN 9781402053023.
  5. ^ "List of Rulers of Korea". www.metmuseum.org. Retrieved 21 April 2019.
  6. ^ Elton, Hugh (1996). "Fravitta and Barbarian Career Opportunities in Constantinople". Medieval Prosopography. 17 (1): 95–106. ISSN 0198-9405. JSTOR 44946209.
  7. ^ "List of Rulers of Korea". www.metmuseum.org. Retrieved 20 April 2019.
  8. ^ The End of Empire. Christopher Kelly, 2009. ISBN 978-0-393-33849-2
  9. ^ The End of Empire (p. 56). Christopher Kelly, 2009. ISBN 978-0-393-33849-2
  10. ^ Burns, Vincent (1992). "The Visigothic Settlement in Aquitania: Imperial Motives". Historia: Zeitschrift für Alte Geschichte. 41 (3): 362–373. ISSN 0018-2311.