40s

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Millennium: 1st millennium
Centuries:
Decades:
Years:
Categories:

Events[edit]

AD 40

By place[edit]

Roman Empire[edit]
Europe[edit]
Asia[edit]

By topic[edit]

Arts and sciences[edit]
  • Philo teaches that all men are born free.
Religion[edit]

AD 41[edit]

By place[edit]

Roman Empire[edit]
Asia[edit]

By topic[edit]

Religion[edit]


AD 42[edit]

By places[edit]

Roman Empire[edit]
Asia[edit]

By topic[edit]

Religion[edit]


AD 43[edit]

By place[edit]

Britain[edit]
Roman Empire[edit]
Asia[edit]

By topic[edit]

Religion[edit]
Arts and sciences[edit]


AD 44[edit]

By place[edit]

Roman Empire[edit]

By topic[edit]

Arts and sciences[edit]


AD 45[edit]

By place[edit]

Roman Empire[edit]
Asia[edit]

By topic[edit]

Religion[edit]


AD 46[edit]

By place[edit]

Roman Empire[edit]
Asia[edit]
  • A drought and an invasion of locusts hit the Mongolian steppes, causing a famine and a revolt at Xiongnu.


AD 47[edit]

By place[edit]

Roman Empire[edit]

By topic[edit]

Religion[edit]


AD 48[edit]

By place[edit]

Roman Empire[edit]
Asia[edit]
  • The Hsiung-nu empire dissolves.
  • The emperor of China, Guang Wudi (Kouang Wou-Ti), restores Chinese domination of Inner Mongolia. The Xiongnu are made confederates and guard the Northern border of the empire.

By topic[edit]

Religion[edit]


AD 49[edit]

By place[edit]

Roman Empire[edit]

By topic[edit]

Religion[edit]

Significant people[edit]

Births[edit]

AD 40

AD 41

AD 42

AD 43

AD 44

AD 45

  • Statius, Latin poet (approximate date) (d. c. AD 96)
  • Plutarch, Greek historian/biographer (approximate date) (d. 120)

AD 46

  • Plutarch, Greek historian (approximate date) (d. c. 120)

AD 48


Deaths[edit]

AD 40

AD 41

AD 42

AD 43

AD 44

AD 45

AD 46

AD 47

AD 48

AD 49


References[edit]

  1. ^ Fabre, Guilhem; Fiches, Jean-Luc; Paillet, Jean-Louis (1991). "Interdisciplinary Research on the Aqueduct of Nimes and the Pont du Gard". Journal of Roman Archaeology. 4: 63–88. 
  2. ^ Burley, Anthony Richard (2005). The Roman government of Britain. Oxford University Press. p. 219. ISBN 978-0-19-925237-4. 
  3. ^ a b Barrett, Anthony A. (2002). Caligula: The Corruption of Power. Routledge. p. 170. ISBN 978-0-203-13776-5. 
  4. ^ a b Adkins, Lesley; Adkins, Roy A. (2004). Handbook to life in ancient Rome (2nd ed.). Infobase Publishing. p. 21. ISBN 978-0-8160-5026-0. 
  5. ^ Dixon, William Hepworth (1865). The holy land. 2. B. Tauchnitz. p. 222. 
  6. ^ Moran, Michael G. (2005). Ballif, Michelle, ed. Classical rhetorics and rhetoricians: critical studies and sources. Greenwood Publishing Group. p. 343. ISBN 978-0-313-32178-8. 
  7. ^ Freedman, David Noel, ed. (2000). Eerdmans Dictionary of the Bible. Amsterdam University Press. p. 262. ISBN 978-90-5356-503-2. 
  8. ^ Scullard, H. H. (2010). From the Gracchi to Nero: A History of Rome 133 BC to AD 68. Taylor & Francis. p. 249. ISBN 978-0-415-58488-3. 
  9. ^ Xiao Hong Lee, Lily; Stefanowska, A. D., eds. (2007). Biographical dictionary of Chinese women: antiquity through Sui, 1600 B.C.E.–618 C.E. 3. M.E. Sharpe. pp. 146–147. ISBN 978-0-7656-1750-7. 
  10. ^ Wiedemann, Thomas E. J. (1989). Adults and children in the Roman Empire. Taylor & Francis. p. 124. ISBN 978-0-415-00336-0. 
  11. ^ a b Varner, Eric R. (2004). Mutilation and transformation: damnatio memoriae and Roman imperial portraiture. BRILL. p. 21. ISBN 978-90-04-13577-2. 
  12. ^ Lightman, Marjorie; Lightman, Benjamin (2007). A to Z of ancient Greek and Roman women. 2. Infobase Publishing. p. 171. ISBN 978-0-8160-6710-7. 
  13. ^ Wadley, Stephen (2006). Proceedings of the First North American Conference on Manchu Studies. Portland, Oregon: Otto Harrassowitz Verlag. p. 133. ISBN 978-3-447-05226-9.